Harnsowl Ko

Student - B.E - Chemical Engineering, Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art
New York, NY, United States

About Harnsowl

Comments & conversations

146063
Harnsowl Ko
Posted about 3 years ago
How does virtuality translate into reality?
As our technology, I think that the lines of reality and virtuality will continue to become blurred. It used to be that something you can see and feel was considered real. Then came the new discoveries of subatomic particles that you can't see with the naked eye nor feel for that matter. Now you can mimic the presence of body parts by manipulating electrical signals, which comes about from a greater understanding of the human body. In every case, what was considered "real" has continued to expand. So, my answer to what's considered "real" is that the definition of it is ever changing as technology continues to grow. For now, the distinction appears to be something that's "there" and something that isn't. In the given example, you can pretend that an anode or cathode is there simply by manipulating the electrical signals within the body.
146063
Harnsowl Ko
Posted about 3 years ago
Can we "engineer" our own interests through repeated exposure?
I feel that we really do can engineer our own interests through repeated exposure. But then again, even just one exposure could possibly do it. Watching how the children in Greg Gage's cockroach beatbox video react is proof. They seem genuinely enthralled by his display. And I feel that this extends into this idea of engineering interest. For instance, how do people start getting into beekeeping? I can't imagine one day a person gets up and decides to do so. It takes exposure to these instances and experiences in order to gain an interest. Little things that might seem nothing at first may end up playing huge roles. It might not be as enthralling as a cockroach's electrical stimulation. But I feel that it is possible to go through life experiencing small things that wind up influencing your interests.
146063
Harnsowl Ko
Posted about 3 years ago
Does society need more interdisciplinary work? Or more well-rounded individuals working together?
Moving forward with this line of thinking, I feel that it is a matter of finding a balance between the two. I feel that now, as we become more specialized, we become less aware of anything outside this specialty. This really is a shame. To me, it is very gratifying to be able to discuss various topics outside of a chosen, specific field. Although it is great that people are becoming more specialized and more cutting-edge work is done, it is very difficult for me to entertain the idea that our world becomes so specialized that we lose the ability to understand the world from various perspectives. This is why what we need is balance, so that we can blend together the specialists and the generalists.
146063
Harnsowl Ko
Posted over 3 years ago
What is the power behind a shared experience?
I'm really glad you brought up the idea of the "Free Hugs" campaign because it was one of those things that showed me that there are people who are willing to go out of their way to create a loving, shared experience for others. I think the power of shared experiences is a result of the feelings evoked in each person given the different situations. These shared experiences can be used to develop stronger bonds between people, and even complete strangers. I think the more people continue to put themselves out into the world and begin to share experiences, people will be able to develop bonds that transcend the petty things that continue to divide us all today.
146063
Harnsowl Ko
Posted over 3 years ago
How are different body parts connected to the emotions we traditionally associate with them?
I was just about to post a comment regarding regarding the same issue, but then i stumbled across this comment! I also have read different accounts of people receiving certain body parts or organs and then feeling a strange connection to a complete stranger, only to find out that the person actually was the one who had donated the organs. If these stories wind up being true, I think that you cannot help but believe that there must be a connection between body and mind that we cannot yet explain. Maybe the nerves present in a body develop a certain relationship to the neurons present in the brain. This is where the feelings associated with a "gut feeling" come from, this relationship manifesting itself at points in the body as a result of an intuitive feeling because the brain has not yet processed information.
146063
Harnsowl Ko
Posted over 3 years ago
How does life/death manifest itself in the human brain? Is brain death the ultimate end stage of life?
I think that, with the constant changing technologies we have, the definition of death also changes. Yes, the activity in the brain ceases while other organs maintain their function, but there is no recovery from brain death, which is why this is the medical definition of death. There is a reason why multiple organ failures do not constitute death in the medical community. It is because we have the ability now to treat these failures or use alternative means to replicate organ function. If one day the time comes that we are able to "restart" the brain, the definition of death would change. The definition would then become a time when a body's organ function and brain both fail. The definition of death constantly changes as technology continues to improve.
146063
Harnsowl Ko
Posted over 3 years ago
Can technology replace human intelligence?
Hi Amirpouya, I think your simplification of the computing process of the human mind is pretty spot on. However, it brings up a question with me. To me, it seems like an artificial mind would need to go through as many iterations as a human has life experiences to fully gain "human intelligence." And even then, how does a computer make decisions that we as humans deem impossible? A computer can master facts and memorize information, but I feel that how it interprets it is no where near that of how a human does. You can assign as many numbers and weights and formulas, but at the end of the day, given a situation where the right answer may be the irrational one, how can we expect a computer to make that distinction?
146063
Harnsowl Ko
Posted over 3 years ago
Where does our identity as being "human" come from?
Thank you for your comment. It really is a wonder, how small we are in comparison to the universe we live in. It puts into perspective how our identities as humans can constantly change depending on individual experiences. We still have much to learn even with all the consistent advances we have made as human beings.
146063
Harnsowl Ko
Posted over 3 years ago
Where does our identity as being "human" come from?
I think that our identity as being human comes from the shared experiences we all share, and ironically enough, that includes our experiences with technology. Our identity as humans cannot be looked at within a bubble; there is so much that goes on in our lives. Our identity includes so many different aspects that cannot be pinned down to simply one thing. Maybe centuries ago, the perception of identity would have been very different. Granted, we are born with the innate foundations of our human identity. However, the things that surround us mold these foundations and continue to do so for the remainder of our lives.
146063
Harnsowl Ko
Posted over 3 years ago
Where does our identity as being "human" come from?
I very much enjoyed reading your comment, especially the distinction between a perception of "being human" and "human being." There clearly is a distinction between the two. To me being a human being is simply the state of being a mammalian creature, while being human is the state of being involved within the bounds of society. There is a distinction between the two, but like you said, the two are related.