Tim Pastoor

Heemskerk, Netherlands

Someone is shy

Tim hasn't completed a profile. Should we look for some other people?

Comments & conversations

143890
Tim Pastoor
Posted over 3 years ago
Given that cloud is becoming more popular to aid in scalability of a business, how are you evaluating your complex cloud contracts?
First of all, by establishing a baseline (in the 3 to 6 months) prior to engaging an SLA with a cloud service provider. The baseline should measure the quality of service. This way you can compare it to any assessment made in the future. The scope of the quality of service can be defined as you wish. What I mean by this is that a company should set up its own priority list according to the demands of the IT department and (therefor) the core business. Combining these two will give you the perfect wishlist for the setup of an SLA with a cloud provider. Anything that will bear to mind when you hear the word 'risk', can be summed up under one (or more) of the following: 1. Accessibility; 2. Recognition; 3. Hospitality; 4. Advice; 5. Meeting promises; 6. Price; 7. Formal handling; 8. Supply and delivery; 9. Support; 10. Maintenance; 11. Communication; 12. Where do we start? After I've prioritized this list, by giving each point a score ranging from 0 to 10, I've also defined what I want and why I want it (vison / strategy / BHAG) in the meanwhile. I can now take this list, while shopping for a cloud provider or while assessing my current supplier, and explain to my accountant afterwards why I've made this choice (Europe, comme ça). This way I'm trying to show you a way to cut out the right formula out of the right piece of wood for any organization, since each one should create its own set of priorities according to their own business. And since I'm in Europe, I prefer a European cloud provider. I'm really not a big fan of the Patriot Act and therefor U.S. cloud providers when it comes to classified data... But I guess that's a whole other discussion. Any questions, comments and/or other feedback are more than welcome!
143890
Tim Pastoor
Posted over 3 years ago
Construction Manual for a Life-sustaining House & Financing Plan
Hey guys, It's good to see so many (Dutch) folks who are interested in this topic. I know a lot of people who are working on sort like projects. To be honest, I've been dreaming of such a house for some years now. This is my personal favorite eco-house building construction: http://calearth.org/building-designs/eco-dome.html It's not that difficult to create your own energy. Storing electricity can be hard enough though, since batteries are not that 'green' and the (in my humble opinion) best solution isn't really there yet on a great enough scale for you and me, hydrogen. Luckily there are better alternatives for most other energy resources (water, wamth, light, etc.). I also believe in going back to smaller scale solutions and thereby reversing 'globalization'. Check out permaculture and what this could do for you. The solutions are mostly here, we just need to be able to combine and utilize them in a way so that they can be financed, and will be sustainable for the long term at the same time. Another thing is the ground you will need for this project. How many square meters will you need, or will you be building higher up?
143890
Tim Pastoor
Posted over 3 years ago
Working in IT?
Hey Sanjay, I'm in IT as a system engineer, and have been in the position where you are. My advice is the same as Douglas gave you: switch jobs. The longer you stay there, the less you'll believe that there's something better out there. Believe me, (almost) everything is better than this. Learn the things you don't like, take a chance you believe in once in a while (keeping a little bit of money aside isn't a bad idea, especially nowadays) and turn those things you don't like into do-likes. Never let an employer numb you down and get you demotivated. I truly believe that your health will increase once you'll become motivated again. Your body/soul is trying to give you the alarm-signal. It's clear to me that you will never grow the way you'd like to do in this organization (read: environment), for as long as you will try with all the passion still left inside of you (which will probably run lower each passing day). I'm curious if you find similarities to yourself in this article: http://talentdevelop.com/articles/GITW.html. I did, and sometimes I read it just to remember what I'd like to become, and to remember that the only person who can tell me if I'm on the right path towards it is me. Find out what gets you motivated in the morning to get out of bed, and thereby find out what your passion is. I know from experience that this isn't easy, but I'm sure that in the end it will be worth it. I believe that you've got the spirit of an entrepreneur and would probably excel at this at some point in the future. Use the time you still work for a boss to learn everything you don't like, and turn it into something constructive and positive. I believe you have a strong character and are a person of good will. Let no one get you down! Bon Voyage Fellow Stranger!! ps: This one was on Dutch TV this evening and is spoken in English. It was a real motivator for me. Hopefully it can do the same for you: http://www.uitzendinggemist.nl/afleveringen/1236635
143890
Tim Pastoor
Posted over 3 years ago
What business models are outdated and what are the alternatives?
On a micro level, we're communicating and sharing information on a massive scale and on the fly nowadays, whereas on a macro-level we've got a monetary system which does the complete opposite when it comes to the social and humanitarian aspect. The way of how money is created is outdated. Therefor more and more people are starting to realize that we need some alternative(s) to this monetary system. To my opinion the problem already starts with governments who'll have to borrow money from private entities which can create said money out of thin air. It's totally bizarre once you start realizing how money creation works. Using this system as a basis for a healthy economy will probably never work. You'll never be able to totally control/balance the money circulating within your system and therefor inflation and deflation (read: purchasing power). Once countries take back the power to print money, from the aforementioned private institutions, and are able to print money debt- and interest-free, their economies will flourish like never before... Well, that's not totally true. Take Colonial Scrip, Hitler's (not that I'm a fan of the man) Labour Treasury Certificates, the English Tallysticks, the Swiss WIR Bank or the Wörgl Experiment for example. I don't believe that it's easy to implement this (Q: What about import/export for example? A: Barter..? Exchange markets..?) but do believe in other alternatives which are already being implemented worldwide noways, such as complementary currencies. I believe that these currencies could stabilize and balance the macro and economic markets and maybe, just maybe, could set an example for a new debt and interest free currency one day. I think that this would be the best solution to get rid of poverty and raise living standards at the same time, but it won't be an easy one.
143890
Tim Pastoor
Posted over 3 years ago
What business models are outdated and what are the alternatives?
Like I've said in my previous reply (to David Grammer), I believe in successful models which derive from the ideology of social return on investment. While entering the 21st century, and as you call it 'the Google age' (I personally call the last decade 'the Google decade'), we're starting to notice that the customer is king once again. Just like the experience you would have had at bakery in the 1950's, businesses are becoming more transparent and accessible once again. At the same time hospitality is increasing and so is the quality of the advice they're giving their customers. More of the boundaries of formal handling are being taken away and at the same time the quality of support, maintenance and communications also increases. The internet is bringing really big change to the (business)world, and therefor I'm convinced that it's a real (economic and social) revolution that could be bigger than the Industrial Revolution.
143890
Tim Pastoor
Posted over 3 years ago
What business models are outdated and what are the alternatives?
Nice analysis David, and I agree with you on this one. The way 'the system' works nowadays is build upon the events that came out of human nature. People shouldn't do anything just to acquire an Armani suit in the first place. If you don't do whatever you do out of passion, you'll never fully enjoy what you're doing. And no, I don't believe in pursuing a life goal of getting that Armani. I believe in business models which pursue a social return on investment, instead of a financial one. Out of this, one can truly become successful and create a business model for the long term. I see new business models around me which are becoming successful, thanks to this concept. I hope the world will see many more, and that many more people will get inspired to create one of their own (especially with other people in a multi-talented formation).
143890
Tim Pastoor
Posted over 3 years ago
Suggestions for speakers
Thanks for the reply. I've been in contact with Ad about the TEDx event, and he's really interested. If you'd like to contact him then you can find him on facebook (under his full name) or via his website (http://www.adbroere.nl). I think he'll make a great speaker, especially on the social entrepeneurship part! Kind regards from the Netherlands, Grtz, Tim