Rick Yi

Taichung, Taiwan

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Rick Yi
Posted over 2 years ago
What do you say about Free Energy proposals from Nikola Tesla?
History has several examples of technologies that were available and feasible but unattractive to policy-makers. If you invent gunpowder, the policy-makers of your country might regard it as a curiosity rather than a replacement for bows and arrows. If you invent an automatic horse-whipping machine (as was prototyped in ancient Rome) the policy-makers might regard it as a toy, not a replacement for a slave who can drive a cart. If you invent free energy, the policy-makers will probably do to you exactly what they did to Eugene Mallove. See also: http://thedailybell.com/3529/The-War-for-the-Internet-Has-Begun quote: Say, for instance, the elites wanted to promote global warming – in order to create a kind of "carbon currency" that they could control and trade at will. In order to do this, the elites would have to proclaim the threat, back it up with scientific studies and then legislate a response to the supposed threat. This is something that actually took place. The Anglosphere elites used their control of the scientific establishment to proclaim a phony hypothesis and then planted specially placed "scientists" at critical choke points to further control the dialogue. It turns out that it doesn't take very many people to control a given conversation or promote a certain campaign. In this case, by generating a cadre of global warming sycophants and putting them in charge of one of only a few "global warming" scientific journals, the elites could virtually create a scientific consensus where none existed. Once the elites had manufactured a phony global warming meme via "peer approved" articles in complaisant journals, the elite-controlled media was turned loose to trumpet the supposed findings. And once the articles were written, elite-controlled UN agencies created white papers from them that could be used as calls-for-action.
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Rick Yi
Posted over 2 years ago
What is the perfect operating system?
OS X is not perfect because it doesn't give enough accessibility. It's a great system, and vastly preferable to Windows. Currently Linux is my favorite POSIX-compliant UNIX-like system. BSD is good too, and OS X is built on BSD. There are a few situations in which one needs a special system - e.g. certain robots and servo-motors are not easy to use with Linux. Linux is catching up and making itself available to almost every platform.
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Rick Yi
Posted over 2 years ago
How do you define God?
'Moses came down and told the tribe that he had been in consultation with the Almighty, a god who is over all gods' This Moses guy is supposed to have lived at a quite late period. People in India and China had coherent philosophies long before anyone ever used the name "Moses." So "God" is not the intellectual property of "Moses." If you want to praise or blame Moses, that's your activity, but it has no bearing on the earlier thinkers who addressed the issue of a Supreme Being.
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Rick Yi
Posted over 2 years ago
How do you define God?
Kurt Godel already defined and proved God quite elegantly. If Godel's axioms are not to your taste, you could always check Bishop Berkeley. If you want to go totally non-Christian, the Upanishads have you covered. The problem is not coming up with an original definition of God - the problem is getting modern folks to understand the old definitions that have been around for all of recorded history. Now, you may object that the Upanishads and "Tat Tvam Asi" are not compatible with Godel's notion of God - but that's a separate debate.
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Rick Yi
Posted over 2 years ago
If a SOPA & PIPA "kills" internet, can someone would be able to make a new one?
Mitch Smith wrote: 'One such model might be "IP Dollars" that cannot be used to purchase physical items. I have other ideas, but I will be talking to a not-for-profit banker (a friend) to work out the details.' I'm not sure where you're going with IP Dollars. Here's a similar project that has already been implemented: http://dot-bit.org/Namecoin When BitCoins are used to pay for Internet hosting and VPN services, they are not being used for physical chattels. However, BitCoins are sometimes used to buy physical things, so perhaps IP Dollars must be different. I would be interested to hear about the features that IP Dollars would offer that BitCoins don't already offer. Maybe there is a niche for IP Dollars, or maybe IP Dollars would be better than BitCoins.
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Rick Yi
Posted over 2 years ago
If a SOPA & PIPA "kills" internet, can someone would be able to make a new one?
Here is a blog that makes claims about the USA-relevant legalities: http://onecandleinthedark.blogspot.com/ The main claim is that CBS Interactive and CNet fuelled piracy, but they are now turning around and trying to sue the people who used CNet to pirate stuff. Apparently CNet somehow made money from pirates, but I don't see how that happened, unless it was by advertising. http://onecandleinthedark.blogspot.com/2011/05/limewire.html The video is at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cLJfJoldELo
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Rick Yi
Posted over 2 years ago
If a SOPA & PIPA "kills" internet, can someone would be able to make a new one?
Some crypto measures are very easy to use. Firefox has a TORbutton add-on, for example. Amateurs can easily install TORbutton with a few clicks and immediately start using TOR. TOR is not suitable for torrents, however, and most amateur security enthusiasts are motivated by the lure of peer-to-peer file sharing. The Pirate Bay has suggested peer-to-peer DNS. http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news/2010/11/fed-up-with-icann-pirate-bay-cofounder-floats-p2p-dns-system.ars they have competition: http://www.i2p2.de/ Some kind of "invisible internet" is a likely replacement to a MAFIAA-dominated internet. However, there will probably be many contenders. The danger is that a plausible man-in-the-middle might offer something as easy to use as TORbutton and eavesdrop on amateurs who think they are secure. Another factor is that BitCoin might turn out to be effective, and various governments might try to ban it, which will probably be as effective as the War on Some Drugs.
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Rick Yi
Posted over 2 years ago
If a SOPA & PIPA "kills" internet, can someone would be able to make a new one?
Here's a serious question: how effectively can governments outlaw crypto? If you're transmitting cleartext, your ISP can do deep packet inspection. But if citizens have strong crypto, I think deep packet inspection won't be able to tell what's in the packets. So, in the short term - encrypt your traffic (probably with an open-source tool) and go to a virtual private network, then do whatever you need to do. I know that many certificates can be spoofed. SSL is not enough. I'm open to suggestions as to how one might build a completely in-house encrypted system from open source tools. However, if you can make it so that you don't depend on third-party certificates - if you issue your own certificates and don't allow anyone else's certificates - it should be possible to make a strongly encrypted darknet. And on that darknet, outsiders should be incapable of censoring you. It's very easy to find tutorials like this one: http://nerdboys.com/2011/02/20/how-to-encrypt-ssl-certificate-private-keys-from-the-command-line-with-openssl/ but I don't know if that toolchain is airtight. Computer security is full of horror stories about organizations that thought they were safe until they discovered that the backdoors had been built in even before they acquired their components. This is not just software issues, as described in "Reflections on Trusting Trust," this is also hardware like a router with a built-in backdoor. http://www.networkworld.com/community/node/57070 http://cm.bell-labs.com/who/ken/trust.html
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Rick Yi
Posted over 2 years ago
If a SOPA & PIPA "kills" internet, can someone would be able to make a new one?
If the USA is stupid enough to shoot itself in the foot, other countries will scramble to gain some limited benefits, but it would be inefficient at best. If the USA makes laws that cause business in the USA to be mostly a huge risk of lawsuits, with only a minor possibility of profit, entrepreneurs will simply set up shop in more business-oriented countries such as Singapore. -- Whoops, I spoke too soon - Singapore is business friendly but the EFF just reported bad news from Singapore: https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2012/01/singapore-considering-anti-piracy-legislation Shirky said that this is a reversal of the burden of proof. Beyond that, it is an allocation of a huge set of special privileges to a plutocratic elite. The USA is already unpopular in many countries - if it restricts freedom of speech for this kind of measure, it will ultimately stir up more resistance to USA hegemony. Furthermore, it will inspire people of marginal computer literacy to seek out computer-literate cypherpunks, pirates, etc. in order to gain access to darknets. The Pirate Bay is tremendously popular. If the USA passes this measure, that popularity will not go away - but it might go underground. More Internet users might learn about virtual private networks. More programmers would spend time on circumvention measures.