Stephanie Rose

Portland, OR, United States

About Stephanie

Areas of Expertise

Thinking and Wondering, Health, dentistry, Sleep Disorders, Buteyko, Big Picture thinking

I'm passionate about

The amazing human body, physical mental and spiritual.

Talk to me about

sleep disorders, breathing disorders, hyperventilation, oral health, inflammation, oxidative stress, hypoxia

Comments & conversations

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Stephanie Rose
Posted over 3 years ago
Intelligent Design
Dearest Gabo, Well, by your term of endearment "Steph" at least we can assume that you don't hate me for my dissension, which I appreciate. I also appreciate the history of the walking fish that you presented. Sorry for my flippant "turning into" wording which suggests strongly of the magic that your practical self would not tolerate. I sadly remain unconvinced, but that is okay. I still maintain that point mutations, genome rearrangements, duplication events, and recombination are insufficient to explain it all. Especially when talking about adding information (more DNA), not just variation. Not to say that it is impossible. I am actually more concerned with the human body, and belief or non belief in evolution is pretty inconsequential. Except for the fact that things I don't understand, instead of dismissing them as artifacts of evolution, I seek to find a purpose behind them. For example, loss of expression for the gene for 3rd molars has been portrayed as an evolutionary advance. We don't need all those teeth, so we're evolving without them. And yet what's really going on is insufficient growth of the mandible to hold the 3rd molars, and subsequent loss of gene expression. Insufficient growth of the mandible is largely a result of hypoxia, improper diet, and improper breathing, and (besides being unattractive) negatively affects the growth and development of the face and airway, and that affects the whole organism. The same is true for lateral incisors. Yet people have labeled this as proof of evolution. (I'm sure you won't agree with them now.) Devolution. Thanks, Steph
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Stephanie Rose
Posted over 3 years ago
Intelligent Design
Also Gabo, Maybe we're not talking about the same things. I'm talking about primordial sludge, single celled organisms turning into multi-celled, fish growing legs and walking out of the ocean, and chimps turning into humans as dubious. That is part of the theory of evolution that I have problems with. I believe that dogs have a common canine ancestor, I believe that humans migrated from Africa/Asia and in Europe advantageously lost their ability to produce melanin so that they could absorb more vitamin D, etc. In none of those instances was there evolution to increase complexity, there was genetic variance that was expressed or not expressed. If that is what you are calling the theory of evolution then I am on board. What I'm NOT on board with is common ancestry from a single celled organism and increasing complexity. Do you see the difference? Complex genetic variance to specialization (with some loss of information) vs. simple to extremely complex.
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Stephanie Rose
Posted over 3 years ago
Intelligent Design
Dear Gabo, Actually I stole that quote by Huxley from a great article by Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, "Are Mormons Any Weirder Than The Rest Of Us?' Read it, it's wonderful. I did not say that evolution was impossible, only improbable and unable to be proved. Natural selection is a process that reduces genetic variance in a population. I think it's great that the origin of life is an open problem; it leads to discussions like this. If we knew everything about the world, what would the fun in that be? I'm actually more concerned with health than evolutionary science, and there's still a lot to be discovered. So are we still evolving today? Yes, we are. We are reducing our genetic variance every day, and becoming more homogeneous. But we're all still human. Evolution requires increasing complexity, and advantageous mutations do not necessarily increase complexity. You must agree that it would take a lot of advantageous mutations to increase complexity from a chimpanzee to a human, hence the billions of years. I don't consider that proof that we came from chimps, even if we share 96% of our genes. Thanks, Stephanie
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Stephanie Rose
Posted over 3 years ago
Intelligent Design
: I was quoting Julian Huxley, the late evolutionary biologist, so I didn't come up with those numbers. But, I don't believe anyone is being honest with themselves if they don't admit that evolution is improbable to say the least, despite the attribution of billions of years to aid in the effort. Even Richard Dawkins theorized about aliens playing a role. In the same way, Intelligent Design is improbable, and more importantly IMPOSSIBLE if you don't believe in a higher power. So it's not surprising that there are heated debates on this subject; one side is using what they know about science and extrapolating it back to understand the world, and the other is using what they know about God to make sense of the world. Unfortunately religious fervor has gotten in the way of science over the years, but I think this speaks more to narrow mindedness and unwillingness to change in our lovely species than to a particular religion. I don't think God is intimidated by science. We can't see evolution happen, we can see natural selection happen. Evolution has some big problems, one of which is the origin of life (something coming from nothing) and the other is speciation (something turning into something else by a series of advantageous mutations.) Natural selection and more importantly, human's selection or "higher selective pressure" is easy to see and duplicate but does not prove evolution. People have been using 'higher selective pressure' for ages to select for desirable qualities in animals specifically. They haven't selected for a different species yet (although the definition of species is dicey as well.) Here's a fun thought: Let's say you fully believe in God and the Bible and the seven day creation story. If you walked in on day 8, how old would you say Adam, and the mountains, waters, trees, plants and animals were? Mature, fully grown, not babies, not seedlings, not eggs. Yet technically you believe they were less than seven days old. How would you determine age?
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Stephanie Rose
Posted over 3 years ago
Intelligent Design
"A proportion of favorable mutations of one in a thousand does not sound much, but is probably generous ... and a total of a million mutational steps sounds a great deal, but is probably an understatement. ... With this proportion, we should clearly have to breed a million strains (a thousand squared) to get one containing two favorable mutations, and so on, up to a thousand to the millionth power to get one containing a million. ... No one would bet on anything so improbable happening ... And yet it has happened!"-Julian Huxley No, I wouldn't bet on it myself.
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Stephanie Rose
Posted over 3 years ago
Will medical advances against cancer mainly help people in wealthy countries or can they help all of the world's people?
I agree that prevention needs to be the focus, not expensive interventions. Unfortunately, pharmaceutical companies seem to run the world, and preventions don't make money and are sometimes tedious. "Get more sleep, eat well, exercise, de-stress" are not glamorous solutions to the cancer problem. We need the brightest minds in the world to actually focus on causes. Cancer cannot exist except in a hypoxic environment.