Parker Moore

GeoBiology Intern, TVMSC
Meridian, ID, United States

About Parker

Languages

English, German

Areas of Expertise

Ethics, Cognitive science

Comments & conversations

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Parker Moore
Posted over 3 years ago
Why for so many is it science or religion with no room inbetween for honest existential consideration?
Relating to Buster the dog, the Schrodinger's Cat experiment does, in a sense, prove to the dog that he is the universe. That is how people see the interactions of everything around them; centered around themselves because all they can view is themselves. They are limited to the specific scope directly affected by the data inflow from senses. This includes reading, talking, feeling, smelling, etc. I guess some of the poor logic there is that I can exist in a world quite different than I perceive, such as one where I am the only real human being, and everyone else is a test person designed to understand how I work. This is not a scientifically disprovable hypothesis because of the lack of reputable data involved with hiding from robots. Putting aside elementary logic, It is conceivable that we could try and communicate with this universal consciousness and test to see if "it" has any effect on the real world. This is testable. Are we certain to get very good results? In my viewpoint, no. But it is still a theory.
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Parker Moore
Posted over 3 years ago
Should public schools in the United States eliminate the traditional A to F grading scale? And if so, what assessment do we replace it with?
The only problem is quantity. There is not enough time in class, or out, to grade every individual's assignment by enough other peers for accurate gradings (they could be incredibly precise but be way off because of a bias specific to those few students) unless there is class-time spent for student-to-class evaluation. The student is removed and the whole class studies the individual's assignment; in this way the class can learn how better to grade by examining their instructor's grading methodology. Putting aside the possible humiliation by the student, two good factors arise: the students will understand what a good paper or assignment looks like helping them to understand through practice how to manage the "workings" of the class (if it were a biology class, people might realize to diagram what they are trying to visualize and subconsciously pick up good habits or in an english class realize they are spending too much time analyzing the occasion and not enough of the credibilty gained by the author in the text ) and second the students are naturally competitive and like Varlan stated "love pointing out other's mistakes" for their own reasons. I feel like it was a lot of rambling for little result. Maybe a better approach would be just not to focus on grading methods but to focus on increasing student motivation and let them decide what seems best for their class through democratic vote. Hmm... looking back on that, I realize that that is not the best solution; too much democracy means an unhappy crowd which inevitably spoils the academic purposes of the classroom where absolute rule is generally required. There needs to be balance between motivational needs(finding ways to inspire kids to move on with their life) and rule in the classroom. Would too much liberty in the classrom cause chaos and havoc or would it liberate kids to think creatively outside of their specific environment? I tend to suspect the former but you can take what you want from it.
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Parker Moore
Posted over 3 years ago
Would you eat "in vitro" meat?
I have a question. Is it possible to grow food using (and this probably is a science-fiction term) hydroponics? Or yeast growth and flavoring using chemical-fed plants? Would a strain of yeast be available for any kind of essential mineral?
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Parker Moore
Posted over 3 years ago
Should public schools in the United States eliminate the traditional A to F grading scale? And if so, what assessment do we replace it with?
True ( to the P.S. ), but in my experience which I understand is specific to my area of the world, some students are lazy when the teacher is not breathing down their necks and neglect to comment intellectually or to attempt to help influence their peers towards the right ideas when it comes to learning and seeing the content agreeably.
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Parker Moore
Posted over 3 years ago
Should public schools in the United States eliminate the traditional A to F grading scale? And if so, what assessment do we replace it with?
Both comments are deeply thoughtful and conceivable but as a response to Andrew, I disagree that society has failed the poorer population in general. This is of course, a multilevel issue, where several facets are much better than some have ever hoped and some obviously worse. Poorer kids do have a greater disadvantage although the current situation in the US, I believe (yes, this might be personal bias) is that most students can achieve most any degree with enough time spent in class and applying for scholarships. Rags to riches stories are not common, but I happen to know several personally myself. It is a careful combination of student loans, time in class, time on the job site, and time with family. "Poor people have poor ways." Is this true? Living in a society that feels so entitled to the riches of the world and with a large (although minor statistically, the dependent population I speculate is bigger than ever before in historical societies) population living on welfare and government benefits that lobbying politicians have been pushed into passing by an ever increasing crowd? One way to mitigate the effects of generational "non-progression" or the passing down of slum characteristics is to introduce the sciences/arts more steadily to a wider population. How do you get a scientist or a large group of them to tour the country talking to kids, inspiring them to move on? It isn't an easy problem easily fixed by money either, since those scientists have jobs, families, and educations to pursue. This contributes to the multilevel idea, like a graphite sheet with layers of information needed for each area of interest. Age, interests, capability, motivation, home-life/family, commitments, morality, education, religion, gender, all play a part in this system. Amanda, 17, kindergarten-sophomore year, catholic, interested in music and graphical design is pressured by her parents to drop out and make money for the family so they can raise kids. Argument? not so easy
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Parker Moore
Posted over 3 years ago
Should public schools in the United States eliminate the traditional A to F grading scale? And if so, what assessment do we replace it with?
The process of school is a commonly known phenomenon that consists of six to nine periods of stipulated time spent staring at the instructor who attempts to get twenty to forty (depending on where you live) young adults to focus on a particular subject he or she is discussing. Is there a way to liberate the mind and motivate students to grow and learn on their own capacity while still conserving the right atmosphere, i.e. not chat hour? Several journalists with a teaching background speculate that online learning is the course to go. Others argue for "team" classes, where students sit in basically a cubicle with several other students and research the topics of the day away from the teacher and then report the findings to the teacher who then gives a comprehensive and overall synopsis of the lesson and leaves time for in-depth conversation. There are various other ideas that formulate inside my head but the question really comes down to ethics. How can a child reason that lying is immoral and wrong if his/her parents are separated because of lost trust? How could you communicate well enough to a college graduate that no one needs a surgeon who cheated his way through med school? Students must be stimulated from an early age that no matter how hard a subject is, if you put enough time into it, the subject will get easier and be rewarding. The loss of morally sound parents to teach their kids that stealing, lying, and cheating is not the correct way to proceed through education where it hampers children in their wider studies outside of the classroom, effectively making the time spent in class worthless. Knowledge is meant to be used and spread, and where it is not, it is there to instruct a student's mind to think cohesively and make comparisons with the real world where it means much more than a letter on a page. Going to school is about teaching you to teach yourself; or in other words teaching you how to learn and where to gain knowledge from trustworthy sources