Emily Baker

The Institute of Art and Ideas

About Emily

Bio

Hi,
I'm Emily a philosophy graduate and keen arts and philosophy enthusiast. Currently I'm working for the Institute of Art and Ideas which organises HowTheLightGetsIn, the world's biggest philosophy festival in the UK.

We're always on the look our for big, inspirational and cutting-edge new ideas to discuss, debate and ultimately share!
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Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

140001
Emily Baker
Posted 7 months ago
Can two observers see one photon simultaneously? And what would be the relevance of me asking this question?
The Many Worlds Interpretation would suggest you could, although it's not currently testable. So right now, no, but conceptually yes. Lev Vaidmen - who pioneered quantum teleportation theory - say that it will be testable and to test it you'll need a mirror (in this video: http://iai.tv/video/in-a-parallel-universe ). I'm not sure I fully grasp this test to be honest, there's another though. Everett firmly believed that his many-worlds theory guaranteed him immortality: His consciousness, he argued, is bound at each branching to follow whatever path does not lead to death. To answer your question about relevance - I think it would be that we would advance our understanding of the universe. Multiverse theory would be out the window and parallel universes would be on the agenda and I think then the question would be what implications would that have for us?
140001
Emily Baker
Posted 8 months ago
Redefine the term "rehabilitation" in context of prison
Rehabilitation is a tricky thing to get right - I'm not entirely sure it's ever going to be successful. Ex-prisoners may have the best intentions but when they return home, they are surrounded by the same issues they were in that caused them to commit the first place. So they're stuck in the same situation, they do the same again and again. So for me, the money should be invested in preventing it in the first place. Look at Singapore, which has some of the lowest crime rates in the world - 16 murders in 2011 with a population of 5.1million. Unheard of! It's down to a very harsh justice system (3 months in prison for graffiti!) with firm penalties (i.e. each offence has a maximum and minimum penalty). It has also been linked to birth rates - Singapore's crime rates dropped when they introduced incentives and penalties for mothers to stop giving birth after having two children. Penalties in the form of reduced child support and the additional child delivery fees and incentives such as priority school admission for the first two children. The reasoning for such a link is simple: Legalised abortion made it easier for women to obtain abortions, and since unwanted children are statistically more likely to turn to crime, it follows that crime rates are lower.
140001
Emily Baker
Posted 8 months ago
How do you sustain a change for the better?
There is some interesting research done into this - how to change our behaviour and adopt new patterns. A couple of scientists talk about it at great length on the below radio programme in the context of New Years revolutions. Of particular interest is how long it takes for someone to form a habit - the research showed that it varied hugely from person to person. Some people took over a year to form one, whilst others took less than a week! I feel I fit into the former bracket :-S http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/podcasts/naked-scientists/show/20140114-1/ As to sustaining behaviour, they offer some good advice in this too. I find writing down goals really helpful and some sort of scheme were I can see how many days I've done it for.
140001
Emily Baker
Posted 8 months ago
David Puttnam: Does the media have a "duty of care"?
Powerful talk. In order to trust those making decisions "we need factually-based options, clearly laid out... we need accurate, unprejudiced information with which to make our own judgments." I couldn't agree more - Too often there are hidden corporate messages interwoven in between the lines! Especially with the birth of China's 50 cent army...
140001
Emily Baker
Posted 8 months ago
Should the selling & using of cigarette & tobacco be banned in the world? If yes, state how can its production be stopped?
I agree. My point wasn't why smoking over alcohol - more that if you ban production of tobacco, where do you draw the line on what the government considers harmful to us? Surely we have the right to make our own decisions so long as we are aware of the consequences. Regardless, I think we are probably on the way to stopping the sale of tobacco, not any time in the immediate future, but certainly in the long term. If you look at the UK, in the last 10 years we've gone from changing the age that you can buy cigarettes (16 to 18); warning signs on packets; graphic imagery and now cigarettes in a lot of retailers are hidden behind screens from customers. What's next? Probably further restrictions and then, I would have thought, stopping of sale.
140001
Emily Baker
Posted 8 months ago
Why do teenagers have a strong attachment to music but view their band/choir/general music requirement as something to get out of the way?
I think band / choir has a stigma attached to it - geeky perhaps and teenage years are a time to be very under-confident and self conscious. So you associate with what you think is 'cool'. Also, it can be terrifying to get up and perform in front of people. Listening is something you do in private. Plus band and choir play certain types of music - if you're into rap, you're hardly going to like band practice. Plus listening to music is very different to playing music. I use to play violin and found the whole thing very frustrating but love listening to it.