Bryce Evans

Owner, Bryce Evans Photography
Red Deer, Ab, Canada

About Bryce

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Bio

Born 1992, Edmonton, AB
bryce@bryceevansphotography.com
www.bryceevansphotography.com

Education:

2010 - Present

Business Administration Diploma, Marketing, Red Deer College, Red Deer, AB

2007 - 2009

Digital Photography, Photoshop, Photo Editing in Multimedia, Hunting Hills High School, Red Deer, AB

2005 - 2006

Film Photography, Film Processing, Digital Photography, Parkview Junior High School, Edmonton, AB

Exhibitions:

2011

Red Deer Arts Council Office Art Exhibit, Solo, Red Deer, AB

Lacombe Art Exhibit and Sale, Group Exhibition, Lacombe, AB

Awards, Honorariums and Grants:

2011

First Place in the Advanced Black and White category, Central Alberta Photographic Society Winter Competition, “That Guy”

Second Place in the Advanced Black and White category, Central Alberta Photographic Society Winter Competition, “Bliss”

Honorable Mention in the Advanced Color category, Central Alberta Photographic Society Winter Competition, “Yankee Knitted”

Second Place in the Amateur Black and White category, Central Alberta Photographic Society Spring Competition, “Ceiling Hangings”

Honorable Mention in the Amateur Color category, Central Alberta Photographic Society Spring Competition, “Beauty & The Bird”

2010

Honorable Mention in the People category, Edmonton Photographic Tradeshow Photography Contest, “Ride”

Professional Affiliations:

2010 – Current

Central Alberta Photographic Society, Webmaster, Red Deer, AB

2010 – Current

Red Deer Arts Council, Red Deer, AB

Professional Experience:

2011

Second Photographer, Troy Young Photography, Red Deer, AB

Waskasoo Optimists’ Bringing Out The Best In Kids Golf Tournament, Official Photographer, Red Deer, AB

Private Collections:

Richard & Lucy Owens, Red Deer, AB

Carla Judson, Red Deer, AB

Geoff Colenutt, Lacombe, AB

Brenda Owens Epp, St. Albert, AB

Travel Experience:

2011 New York City, NY, USA

2010 Honolulu, HI, USA

2007 Chicago, IL, USA

2000 Tokyo, Japan

2000 Perth, Australia

2000 Singapore, Singapore

2000 Los Angeles, CA, USA

1997-1995 Lived in Houston, TX, USA

Visited: San Antonio, TX, USA
Austin, TX, USA
New Orleans, TX, USA

Languages

English

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

Noface
Bryce Evans
Posted over 2 years ago
Why aren't kids (+ young adults) given more credit?
I completely disagree David, not everyone is going to need 15, 20, or 30 years "before you do anything even remotely interesting". For example, there is a 12 year old boy who has written 5 full length symphonies already, something that most composers MIGHT accomplish in a lifetime, I find that quite interesting. Now yes, he has obviously taken his ideas and worked them out into action, I agree with that point, but I am sure that he has had help and support along the way (ex. his parents bought him a bass when he was very young). However, that is exactly what is wrong with our world, no one listens. I believe the purpose of this conversation is not whether children and young adults are heard and given praise for good ideas. That happens all the time, even too much, like you said when kids are over praised for mediocre work/ideas. It is the fact that when they have an incredible idea that could change the way we live, no one gives the idea real merit because of the person's age. No one truly believes and is willing to get involved or even discuss the idea because the idea is automatically discounted due to age. Another example, like I said before, is rules and terms of competitions that rule out entrants that are below a certain age. Of course, I understand that for certain laws people need to be over 18 or 21, but over than that I believe this is unnecessary in most situations.
Noface
Bryce Evans
Posted over 2 years ago
Why aren't kids (+ young adults) given more credit?
I completely agree with your first point Allan. For example, if you look at talent shows on television such as "America's Got Talent", there are so many kids who are able to go up on stage with no nerves and give it all they have. This is due to the lack of influences, restrictions, worries, stresses, experiences of rejection, etc. Kids are able to share any idea they have because they have not built up the horrible filter of fear that most people do when they grow old. People tend to reject ideas before even analyzing them fully because they label it to be "impossible", "silly", "naive", "crazy", etc. Those tend to be the best ideas!
Noface
Bryce Evans
Posted over 2 years ago
Why aren't kids (+ young adults) given more credit?
Unfortunately, for me it lasted up until high school and still affects me today. I would suggest getting a job (if possible), it allows you to be around people much older than you, which I found helped. College and university are also a lot better than high school because of the wide range of ages attending. Regarding not being heard, speak up and never stop. In fact. yell if you feel you have an idea worth sharing. :)
Noface
Bryce Evans
Posted over 2 years ago
Why aren't kids (+ young adults) given more credit?
This has constantly frustrated me as a young adult (now 19), as I matured quicker than most kids my age when growing up. It has been hard to gain respect form some people much older than me, at times taking more work than it should to prove myself. I completely agree with Joe that we need to have more mentors for young adults with great ideas and talents. I think this would have quite an impact on how adults view the younger generation, once the protégées succeed. One point that really gets on my nerves is regarding art submissions and certain organizations that will only take proposals from "professional artists" and will not allow undergraduate students to apply. I understand reasons for this, but I believe that the art community is missing out on a lot of great work and ideas by restricting young people like this. This is just one example I have experienced in my life. It is incredible to hear children and young adults talking on TED, and I know there are more that would flourish if given more credit (where it is due).