Tom Criss

Indianapolis, IN, United States

About Tom

Languages

English

I'm passionate about

Computing, the Internet, Mobile Devices, App development, the progression and persistence of the Human race and Earth.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

219368
Tom Criss
Posted 4 months ago
Dan Gilbert: The psychology of your future self
I feel different from what Dan Gilbert described at 5:23, because I imagine the future so much that I forget about remembering the past. It's like I am flying a plane in the sky, chasing ideas and running off of ambition. But even though I grab onto some of these ideas, sometimes for days or even months, I feel like I never land with them. I aways see a brighter idea on the way and let go of the one I've been holding. No matter how much I imagine, I still don't know the who's, what's, or how's of my future, but I know why I will land where I will, and it's because I chose to fly a plane of uncertainty in search of the brightest idea.
219368
Tom Criss
Posted 4 months ago
Michel Laberge: How synchronized hammer strikes could generate nuclear fusion
I agree that the Sun is a huge source of energy that is usable in many applications. The Sun's energy is practically renewable and is responsible for the energy on Earth, including the natural balances between our geological and ecological systems. But how much of this energy can we divert, convert, or ignore before suffering from consequential imbalances of our natural systems? With human civilization out of the picture, the Earth does a great job sustaining our environment; we adapt to it and therefor it sustains us. But with human civilization back in play, we are unbalancing the natural systems by reintroducing energy in ways that have tremendous effects on our energy cycle, such as the thermal energy from combustion of fossil fuels and byproducts like greenhouse gasses. I think that using any energy that is not being directly applied to our planet (from extraterrestrial sources, such as solar) may have unnatural effects on our planet. This includes the use of energy converted from matter such as fossil fuels and nuclear, but even renewable energy such as geothermal. Remember that energy is not consumed nor created, but converted to and from matter. Life converts solar energy into chemical, and is then passed around, some shed into other forms like thermo and kinetic, until the chemicals are reduced to carbon and buried. We are reversing this process by digging up the carbon and turning it into electric, kinetic, and gaseous chemicals, which leads to an increase in thermal energy in the atmosphere and the blocking of light to the surface, which contributes to the former and is vital to life. Renewable energy like geothermal skips the conversion of matter to energy, but has the same conclusion because it brings thermal energy to the atmosphere. Hydroelectric and Wind do not lead to this same conclusion, because their energy comes from the surface, but their efficiency has less potential than solar because they are merely side-effects of solar.
219368
Tom Criss
Posted 5 months ago
David Epstein: Are athletes really getting faster, better, stronger?
I think fame, consumerism, and social networking has a lot to do with Epstein's last point of about mindset and motivation. Sports and sports-related products are everywhere nowadays. Children grow up with games playing on the TV and athletes in the commercials in between breaks, drinking specially formulated sports drinks because they taste good and not always to rehydrate, wearing the names of athletes on their clothing, and then they go to school where the athletes are made popular by the school's recognition, and even the Hall of Distinction is mostly of athletes and coaches. Kids grow up with sports being very important to not just their health and communities, but many aspects of their lives, including their ambitions and expectations. I ride my bike a lot, and I always use an app that tracks my performance and uploads it to a social network, and it makes me feel more proud about my accomplishments. Without the app, I would still ride, but I wouldn't feel as motivated to beat my last time or the times of my competitors. Competition and leaderboards are nothing new to sports, but the accessibility and scale it has reached is new. Before, you had to join a team or enter an event to be recognized for your performance, but now we carry the races and teams in our pockets. I'm not attacking fame, consumerism, or social networking. I'm just pointing out that there is a lot more affecting our motivation other than just to push the limits.
219368
Tom Criss
Posted 5 months ago
James Patten: The best computer interface? Maybe ... your hands
I'm interested in how humans can significantly help with simulated protein folding. Humans have no natural ability of interacting with molecules. We cannot see or feel anything at the molecular level with our eyes or hands. How could a human do more work than a computer? This just doesn't seem practical to me. But I am intrigued by the idea of combining the advantages of both man and machine to increase efficiency. I'm sure these ideas can be applicable in more situations, we just haven't thought of them yet.
219368
Tom Criss
Posted 5 months ago
Michel Laberge: How synchronized hammer strikes could generate nuclear fusion
Wonderful content and enthusiasm! The simple change in design with the impact pistons makes a big difference! I'm a bit disappointed that we haven't developed a solution for harnessing heat that is more efficient than the steam-turbine method. I suppose we do have technology like Thermoelectric generators, but it hasn't been improved nearly as much as the steam turbine has.
219368
Tom Criss
Posted 5 months ago
Jeremy Kasdin: The flower-shaped starshade that might help us detect Earth-like planets
I'm confused. Is this a solution for focusing telescopes on areas near the Sun? If so, then that makes sense why we can't just take photos while a telescope orbits the dark side of the Earth or Moon, because we would not have a line of sight near the direction of the Sun. I wonder if the bending of light due to gravity of celestial masses could be used to work around this problem.
219368
Tom Criss
Posted about 1 year ago
Russell Foster: Why do we sleep?
My experience with sleep deprivation has shown me that creativity can result from lack of sleep. I think it is the impulsiveness Foster labeled as a symptom that leads to creativity. The ideas and other creative thoughts were not conjured from brainstorming, but from out of nowhere. Has anyone else experienced this spark of random genius when they were very sleep deprived?
219368
Tom Criss
Posted over 1 year ago
Afra Raymond: Three myths about corruption
Transparency of transactions and the information we desperately need will not be given without being driven by bribes and corruption of its own. It has to be forced, it cannot be asked of. The corrupt may be powerful, but fear is powerful and we need the corrupt to fear what may be happening behind their backs. The fear that information may be slipping through their closed doors, leaking into society and becoming well-known facts, that is how we stop them. I don't know how exactly we can promote these leaks but I know of the means of communication for it and it is through the power of peer-to-peer exchange through the internet. We need more people like Julian Assange, founder of WikiLeaks, who are willing to take the risks to bring light to this corruption and help make the world a better place for all but the corrupt. If the site is taken down, the information will continue to spread through a network of untraceable chaos.