Morton Bast

editorial coordinator, TED
New York, NY, United States

About Morton

Bio

Morton Bast comments, proofreads, fact-checks, moderates, reads, writes and reasons for TED.com. She has a B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis, a thirst for knowledge, and a medium-sized collection of Hello Kitty paraphernalia. She is also a New Yorker, for which there is no known cure.

Languages

English, French

TED Conference

TEDActive 2013

I'm passionate about

Creating community, learning new words, downtime, walking as a means of transportation, diversity, toothbrushing, family.

Talk to me about

religion, adolescence, chick lit

People don't know I'm good at

geography, untying knots, rhyming

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

178141
Morton Bast
Posted 17 days ago
Clint Smith: The danger of silence
Hi Acquanda - That's definitely a negative stereotype that gets passed around, but if you poke around our selection of talks I think you'll find that we have a wide range of voices, including those who've put their lives and careers on the line to create change in a very radical way. If there's a person or subject area you feel like we're missing out on, you can suggest a speaker here: http://www.ted.com/nominate/speaker
178141
Morton Bast
Posted 20 days ago
Nick Hanauer: Beware, fellow plutocrats, the pitchforks are coming
Very well put. I wasn't quite able to pinpoint why the reference to the barefoot fruit salesman fell short here. My initial reaction was that it wasn't convincing or realistic -- that I didn't get the sense that he was talking about an actual person, but about a stereotype. I thought it detracted from the talk because, unlike much of what he's discussing, it didn't seem to come from any kind of firsthand knowledge or experience. But I think you've hit on a more important aspect of it: It may be the respect, more so than the footwear, that determines the success and happiness of the entrepreneur.
178141
Morton Bast
Posted 24 days ago
Margaret Gould Stewart: How giant websites design for you (and a billion others, too)
An interesting perspective. I think the thing about Facebook being so large and having so many users is that there are many, many people who feel the way you do, and also many, many people who feel very differently. Their staff needs to design for users who love their product and for users who hate their product. While "crap" is subjective, making it pretty hard to create a universal crap filter, they do have plenty of tools for limiting what type of posts can appear on your newsfeed, and from whom. I'm not suggesting you should try harder to make your Facebook be what you want it to -- if you're just not a fan, you're just not a fan -- but I do think it's important to keep in mind that everyone uses it differently. There are those who feel that it is (rather than could have been) a great tool for social awareness, because that's how they use it.
178141
Morton Bast
Posted 2 months ago
Jamila Lyiscott: 3 ways to speak English
Yes, I believe her poetry is indeed protesting something -- it's protesting the fact that many people view two of these forms of spoken English as "a rape of the English language." It's quite a legitimate protest, one that's central to the study of language and culture in America, and not at all in her head. And you may not think that's substance, but I certainly do.
178141
Morton Bast
Posted 2 months ago
Ruth Chang: How to make hard choices
It sounds like this was not a great talk for you and what you're going through, as you're facing a very different set of circumstances. You're of course right about the importance of turning to others for outside help, and I'm very glad you're doing so. Wishing you the best from us here at TED.