Dan McNe

Lawrence, KS, United States

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Dan McNe
Posted 4 months ago
Ruth Chang: How to make hard choices
Upon further looking into the speakers publications, she is quite well acquainted the concepts of incomparability and incommensurability. If you still hold that there is no way to make a _rational_ decision between choices which are not placed on a linear scale, then my suggestion is that it is exactly our values (safety, flexibility, money, social concerns) that allow the construction of a map from a lattice valued logic to a linear valued one. Finally, some research suggests that flexibility is (or ought to be) highly valued -- at least in early stages. (I believe there is a TED talk about this.) I think the speaker will find that in her own career choices as well.
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Dan McNe
Posted 4 months ago
Ruth Chang: How to make hard choices
This is plainly wrong. The speaker seems to be suggesting that we define our values by the choices we make -- this simply isn't the case, though clearly our choices and later rationalization of them may affect the development of our values. The speaker needs to study non-standard logics a lot more if she thinks rational choices can be made only between selections on a linear scale. While it's true that classical (and intuitionistic) logic ({0,1} valued) and multi-valued (fuzzy) logic ([0,1] valued) are more theorectically advanced than logics which have more general "lattice values," these and modal logics, along with para-consistent logics are making considerable strides. In particular, the concept of "on a par" can easily be modelled in a bounded lattice by "incomparable" elements -- for example, elements whose meet (and) is the bottom (0, false) and whose join (or) is the top (1, true). Don't imagine that the science of logic ended with the syllogism and Aristotle, logicians and mathematicians are still (well, since around the early 1900s) making incredible advances in this field.
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Dan McNe
Posted almost 3 years ago
Dan Dennett: Dangerous memes
Memetics might not be a scientific theory, but, like the "scientific process," a collection of methods providing a philosophy and paradigm in which to interpret certain observations.
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Dan McNe
Posted almost 3 years ago
Clay Shirky: Institutions vs. collaboration
This is not an error in any sense. Look up "whine vs wine" on Wikipedia. His pronunciation is simply a much more traditional pronunciation that has survived in and around the Appalachian Mountains -- betraying him as an "educated Southerner." (In fact, checking his Wikipedia page says he is from Missouri.)