About Marek

Languages

Czech, English

Areas of Expertise

Philosophy of Mind

I'm passionate about

Aviation, Cognitive Science, Bio-Inspired Robotics

Comments & conversations

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Marek Vanžura
Posted over 2 years ago
What should the 21st century classroom look like? Could interactive technology provide solutions to the current system of education?
Hi Jose, many thanks! Well, my point was that some part of process of turning to the education as more fun is through modern technologies, which we use to better visualization of connections between education (which would be sometimes uninteresting) and their real lives (which they live and have the biggest value for them). I mean, if they will see that they are not learning something useless but highly important, then it is very probable that they will really enjoying it. And what about your question how to skip to the education as a game? Well, my idea is to look at what is the most interesting aspect of games. I think that it is perhaps something like big integration into the games. So we may take this aspect and put it into education. And If we do this I think then we are on a right way to solve this part of problem. In short, my idea here is that through studying of "addictive" aspect of games we can teach a lot about how to implement some improvements into our education. Unfortunately I actually have no more ideas how to do this really big and important step.
Noface
Marek Vanžura
Posted over 2 years ago
What should the 21st century classroom look like? Could interactive technology provide solutions to the current system of education?
Hello Jose! Your topic really excites me. I want to sketch some brief idea which came to my mind during thinking about your questions. Well, certainly, game technology can make education more fun, also engaging but I am not so sure about its value. It probably depends on how well it would be balanced. I want to draw one example. From my experience, a lot of people around me said that education is too abstract. Concrete example should be mathematics. Actually only few students in every class enjoy mathematics (I am speaking about primary and secondary schools). And if you ask them why, they answer that because they cannot touch something out there. And this is the place where game technologies can do really big job. I mean, for example, you can use some virtual reality where numbers and equations and other stuff would be visualized and connected to some real life situations and things in our everyday lives. When teacher is speaking let's say about mathematics (and physics) of combustion engine, pupils aided with some virtual reality glasses would be exploring appropriate parts in real time. And I am sure that it is possible to use it in more abstract mathematics and also in other fields of studies. In sum, I think that game technologies can make education really better, especially in situations where words are too abstract and it is pretty hard to imagine some applications and so forth. So, this was my modest idea for your theme. I hope it is not superficial and useless.