Melissa Mendez

Philadelphia, PA, United States

Someone is shy

Melissa hasn't completed a profile. Should we look for some other people?

Comments & conversations

Noface
Melissa Mendez
Posted almost 3 years ago
What are the Top 5 things you can teach/share with a 6 year old?
My little one is not yet 6, but we teach her that 'failure' is part of a larger effort. So we don't dwell on any one unsuccessful attempt as a failure, but take it as part of a process and ask what we can improve. In time I hope she'll realize that if something is easy enough to get right the first time, it may not be as satisfying as something else that required a few stumbles along the way.
Noface
Melissa Mendez
Posted almost 3 years ago
What's one thing you wish you had learned in school?
And a related topic - reproduction. How many people understand the nuances of menstruation? Many women in their 30s don't; lots of doctors don't. ...and men, I think they're mostly lost. Knowing some of the details would help so many women and partners just understand and work with their monthly and fertility issues.
Noface
Melissa Mendez
Posted almost 3 years ago
What's one thing you wish you had learned in school?
Teach people to recognize and develop the process by which they decide whether things are 'right' or 'wrong.' It would be progress even if children were taught that such processes exist, so that they could return to the idea on their own. The first I heard of the study of ethics or was introduced to any ethical decision-making tools was grad school. Why not kindergarten?
Noface
Melissa Mendez
Posted almost 3 years ago
What's one thing you wish you had learned in school?
There is a huge gulf between the exec who dreams of nothing but the next dollar, and someone living an ascetic life in the woods. Maybe we could hope to teach an appreciation for what money is: a tool. Like all tools, it's put to use to accomplish things (like, food every day and a warm bed). It allows you to save, to protect yourself from troubles over time. In putting down single-mindedness, lets not pretend that money isn't damn useful, especially when there's none around... I wonder if a lot of people now think that w live in a zero-sum economy, that somehow, by doing with less, they enhance someone else's ability to have more. Perhaps we should teach economics. Whether you're a Keynesian or a laizze-faire-ist or think it's all bunk, it would be something if we could have a more knowledgeable citizenry in the discussion of national and world economic policies.
Noface
Melissa Mendez
Posted almost 3 years ago
What's one thing you wish you had learned in school?
I cannot claim a rough upbringing, but have worked with 'disadvantaged' kids. Children, for the most part, will rise to expectations. I'm certainly not the first one to notice this. But we have to be willing to ask a lot of them! To let them fail. To give them hard tasks that will let them work hard and accomplish something difficult. Over and over, until accomplishment becomes second nature. The best schools - the highly awarded, private, expensive ones - challenge the pants off kids! It's what makes them good schools. Its because public schools demand so little, that private schools become attractive. So I agree with you about victimization not helping. Recently, I live somewhere where I'm surrounded by folks with their hands out. I listen on the buses and in the stores, and it's all about how to game the system. I live in a city of victims, many of whom have completely stopped trying to accomplish anything (at least as related to the generation of personal income). We can argue, in a big-picture sense, whether schools should turn out rote-trained workers or give us all wings to fly, but in the shorter term, lets just get a country full of people who can read, add and hold a job. But back to the classroom. It isn't enough that learning be challenging and engaging. Many kids also lack the necessary home training to get along with other people (in a classroom, on a bus, at the supermarket or in an eventual workplace). Compounding this, teachers have no recourse. So one bad kid totally distracts a classroom-full, and a few bad kids turn the room into a circus. Why did we stop demanding polite behavior, respect and (dare I say it) obedience? I see elementary-aged kids mouthing off like sailors - to their parents and teachers. Please, someone post here a good explanation of how failing to teach children how to behave is in anyway good for their psyche or well-being. How was it ever concluded that we were all supposed to coddle children, all the time?
Noface
Melissa Mendez
Posted almost 3 years ago
What's one thing you wish you had learned in school?
"The value of integrity, self awareness, nature, money, health... That's a parent's responsibility." Here, here. I wish more parents took it upon themselves to lead by example. I see too much parenting-by-television accompanied by frustration that schools aren't doing enough!