Wm Curtis Szabo

IT Consulant
Minneapolis, MN, United States

About Wm Curtis

Bio

ISTJ (Myers-Briggs)
High DC (DISC Test)
Learner, Individualization, Achiever, Context, Input (Strength's Finders)

I have been crucified with Christ; it is no longer me who lives but Him who lives in me... (Christ follower)

My heroes are Socrates, Thomas Sowell, MLK Jr, & Major Richard Winters

Currently I am an IT Consultant with a small firm in MPLS, MN.

I really enjoy good writing and try to dabble in it (can't you tell? view my blog and see for yourself).

My humor is dry and often barbed.

Languages

English

An idea worth spreading

"The unexamined life is not worth living." - Socrates

"People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use." - Søren Kierkegaard

"I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen: not only because I see it, but because by it I see everything else." - C. S. Lewis

I'm passionate about

Finding Truth, Education, Culture, Jesus, promoting self-awareness, dry wit

Talk to me about

Human Nature/Condition, Christian Apologetics, Evolution, Politics, Pop-Culture, Philosophy, Literature, Music, Economics, Theology

Comments & conversations

133853
Wm Curtis Szabo
Posted almost 3 years ago
Is there any difference between belief in the Big Bang and religion?
No. Both boil down to faith propositions. Yes, that's right the Big Bang boils down to faith. Now, answering this question gets tricky because by BB, you could mean the cause for the universe's existence, evolution, science, or all of the above. Let's assume you only mean the cause for the U's existence. In which case, the BB is even more like religion because it can't be demonstrably proven in a test tube. The BB was (supposedly) a historical event that happened once in time never to be recreated. No amount of empirical evidence is ever going to prove the BB with all certainty. Furthermore, David Hume proved all knowledge comes down to faith 200 years ago. It's one of the greatest epistemological quandaries known today: nothing can be deemed as 100% certain. Not even Science. With that said, I don't see a problem with saying that Jesus exists and the BB happened too. If Jesus is the creator of the Universe I certainly believe that he is capable of creating the BB as we know it. I mean we're talking about God here - who upholds the universe by the palm of his hand. Why is it that so many people assume science and religion are diametrically opposed? Personally I find that the world is much more easily understood through my relationship with Jesus. It allows for science, philosophy, morals, ethics, etc. Christianity is much more inclusive of how this world works. Science, on the other hand, as an absolute authority is a much more narrow and a less encompassing worldview.
133853
Wm Curtis Szabo
Posted almost 3 years ago
How do you feel about the responsibility of the government towards the young people (18-25) regarding the economic and financial crisis?
No, of course not. I love capitalism and free market economies. What I mean by 'deny themselves' is this: "That govt is best which governs least." Now, I am not anti-govt, neither was Thoreau. What he meant is that we don't need nor should we look to the gov't to govern every aspect of life. In fact gov't is better when its citizens are self-governing. In other words govt is better when the citizens are keeping each other accountable and actively meeting the needs of the local community. Here's an example: I live in MPLS, MN a fairly large city with gang and crime problems. This past summer, drug dealing and gang crimes in one park had gotten out of control. My church responded by hosting dinner and a movie in the park every Sunday for six weeks to feed the neighborhood; even some of gang-bangers ate with us too. Literally, the crime stopped overnight. Self-denial in this instance was resisting the urge to overturn our municipality because of its inability to control crime. Self-denial was people taking time out of their schedules to help the local community. Self-denial was us not expecting or waiting for or our city to do anything. We just saw what needed to be done and we did it. Obviously, not all circumstances are the same and not every situation can be approached like this. There are issues that only govt can and should deal with. But it all goes back to how we view the role of our govt and our role within it; of thinking 'how can I make USA better' rather than 'how can USA make me better.' If we wanted MPLS to make us better then we would have been idle and demanded our city to do something about the crime. Finally, I think we will have to agree to disagree on the hardship bit. I sympathize for those who suffer, but people cannot expect their govt to be a savior. It's a dangerous social dynamic that gives too much control to the State. Plus, it's okay to be 'unequal.' Why is it we think the highest moral is equality? I'll need to qualify I'm sure.
133853
Wm Curtis Szabo
Posted almost 3 years ago
How do you feel about the responsibility of the government towards the young people (18-25) regarding the economic and financial crisis?
Letitia, I think you & I agree & disagree at the same time. I'll clarify my position with the hope it will bring clarity to yours. ;) I think the 'paradigm' I am talking about is systemic throughout all USA from young to old and all social classes. & yes I'll concede that OSW is protesting gov't bailouts but they are making demands for jobs and economic equality; and some people are even demanding 'down with the fed.' The problem isn't with our gov't, but with 'we' the people. My gripe isn't with what people are demanding, but more so the posture people are demanding from. That is, it seems pretty obvious to me that Americans have an entitlement complex. We think economic equality, healthcare, jobs, social security, education, etc. are our rights. And on the other side, corps/banks want bailouts. These are not rights we have in our constitution. Show me where, if they are there. And yes I desire to improve the quality of life in USA. But sometimes you need to break a broken-bone even more so it can heal properly otherwise it will be damaged permanently. Our country is in the same situation. It's broken. And our approach to solving our problems is trying to put a band-aid on rather than stepping back & assess the sacrifices we need to make in the short-run to benefit the long-run. Not one politician we have is talking like this (except maybe Ron Paul) because Americans don't want to hear it and our Politicians are so polarized by their ideologies that no one is willing to come out of their ivory towers and demand effective results. Furthermore, hardships are a part of life. I have seen the benefits of it in mine. I don't desire for people to suffer but our gov't has no right to legislate happiness, it can only protect our right to PURSUE happiness. Happiness is not a right it's a privilege. So when I say 'make USA better' I don't mean social programs, I mean the ethos: a united Spirit that drives USA to rally together and deny oneself for our country.
133853
Wm Curtis Szabo
Posted almost 3 years ago
How do you feel about the responsibility of the government towards the young people (18-25) regarding the economic and financial crisis?
3 quotes come to mind: 1. "That government is best which governs least" HD Thoreau 2. "Ask not what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country." JFK 3. "Few things can help an individual more than to place responsibility on him, and to let him know that you trust him." Booker T Washington The state of our economic crisis has revealed a deep cultural paradigm within America. That is to say, we expect our government to legislate happiness. Take Government Bailouts or Occupy Wall Street for example. Or our heated debates on Healthcare, Social Security, cheaper education, etc. From jobs to education to social welfare and healthcare these institutions of our government are privileges not constitutional rights. But many of us in our country act as if the removal of any of these is an act against our inalienable rights. The fact of the matter is our government exists to promote Life, Liberty, & the PURSUIT of happiness. The US government does not exist to legislate or provide happiness. Thus, I am inclined to say that many of our economic woes are due to an inflated view of what a government should provide; in turn this affects our politics, media, and education. Somehow we got the idea that the American Dream is a constitutional right. But it's not. Never in the history of mankind has a country been without hardships. And to expect our government to make life easy for us is ridiculous. Beyond protecting LL&PofH, the only responsibility our government has to its young people (and everyone for that matter) is to instill a national fervor that causes us to take ownership of our country; a fervor that enables us to reach our hands out rather than expect handouts, a fervor that expects hardship and delights in perseverance, a fervor that looks at the interests of our fellow Americans as better than our own. If every American thought "How can I make USA better?" rather than "How can USA make me better?" this country would be better for it.