Chris Gropp

Columbus, OH, United States

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Chris Gropp
Posted over 3 years ago
Asian religions/philosophies better prepare an individual for pursuits of "divine reality" than that of Western traditions.
The PNC really *defines* western thinking. To its credit, it supports an objective worldview that is needed for scientific thinking, and for legalistic thinking, that creates undeniable absolutes. On the good side we get everything that science and technology and property rights have to offer: incredible power. But on the bad side it entails a denial of certain subjective truths, truths that are conditional, limited, temporal and that reside in every mind. The thinking in the East sees these subjective truths as ultimately being more primary. I don't think the east gives us atomic energy, space flight, or the holocaust. I don't think the west cannot permit the idea, I am God, and so are you. Painting these two with broad strokes, admittedly. What is grand is the vast merging of these two ways of thinking that is accelerating before our eyes.
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Chris Gropp
Posted over 3 years ago
Asian religions/philosophies better prepare an individual for pursuits of "divine reality" than that of Western traditions.
Western cognitive scientists have pursued a scientific approach to understanding the brain, while the easterners traditionally, it seems to me from my impression of the historical record as we have it now, spent much more time evaluating the mind from inside. Many of the same conclusions through those different means. I see some noteworthy philosophical differences between east and west that bear on the subject. Parmenides is at the historical root of Western metaphysics, saying, "Never shall this be proved, that things that are not, are." the principle of non-contradiction, the root of western metaphysics. There are few exceptions among western philosophers and they mostly just prove the rule. Science, arising in the Western climate, with the Western linear alphabet, cannot permit a thing to be what it is not. On the other side, some notable ideas from eastern luminaries: the Buddha - "We are what we think. With our thoughts we make the world." Socrates, living at roughly the same time, "disproved" this as recorded in the dialogue the Theaetetus (penned by Plato) in which he showed that if each man is the measure of all things, then two contradictory things would have to be be true, which is impossible. I suspect a broader logic is embodied in the Buddha's thinking, a non-temporal visionary logic. Chuang Tzu - To illustrate the last point, the story of Chuang Tzu dreaming he was a buttefly: "Once Zhuangzi dreamt he was a butterfly, a butterfly flitting and fluttering around, happy with himself and doing as he pleased. He didn't know he was Zhuangzi. Suddenly he woke up and there he was, solid and unmistakable Zhuangzi. But he didn't know if he was Zhuangzi who had dreamt he was a butterfly, or a butterfly dreaming he was Zhuangzi. Between Zhuangzi and a butterfly there must be some distinction!" Indeed!! like dreams, the trance of meditation can have the same non-distinction intuitions.