Rowan DeBues

Undergraduate - Political Science, University of Toronto - Faculty of Arts and Science
Toronto, Canada

About Rowan

Bio

Salutations! I was born in the UK, however I moved to Canada when I was eleven. I am currently doing a double major in Political Science and in English at the University of Toronto (specifically Victoria College). While I don't have the right kind of brains to study it properly, I take great enjoyment out of reading about the latest and greatest scientific innovations. I am definitely a sucker for the science fiction, however much more likely to write a novel about it than bring it into reality.

Languages

English, French

An idea worth spreading

Shut up, quit whining and find a solution to the problem (that isn't racist, homophobic or leads to mass murder and/or genocide).

I'm passionate about

Biggest extra-curricular passion in my life is rugby. I live and breath the sport and would have to admit to following nearly 100 players on twitter...

Universities

University of Toronto

Talk to me about

Whatever you want to talk to me about. Just speak in a language I will understand (not mathematical equations in other words...)

People don't know I'm good at

Diffusing tense situations

Comments & conversations

133309
Rowan DeBues
Posted almost 3 years ago
Paul Root Wolpe: It's time to question bio-engineering
I am scared a little bit by the idea of organi-bots. If it can think for itself then we are creating a new form of sentient life I believe. Risky though it may, I would only be okay with having the "eel brain" kind of life if it could be guaranteed not to suffer from what we are doing to it. If we can stop it being hurt then it is marginally ok (I am still a bit iffy with the idea) to use them. I am in general in support for advanced bio engineering of this type.
133309
Rowan DeBues
Posted almost 3 years ago
Paul Root Wolpe: It's time to question bio-engineering
Humanity has been pushing the boundaries of life expectancy for thousands of years, why does it become wrong to do so now? I know that if I were given the chance to live the future of humanity I would. Just cause your life has been extended half a century doesn't mean you are no longer human. I went to elementary school with a boy called Graham Clarke, who sadly passed away in just grade seven due to cancer. Our lives can be claimed any day by any variety of circumstances. Another friend of mine just last month was a passenger in a car accident and broke his spine. That would happen whether you are new body/old brain or not. This would just enable us to live to face off more of these random circumstances.
133309
Rowan DeBues
Posted almost 3 years ago
Paul Root Wolpe: It's time to question bio-engineering
I have my concerns about humanity. We have come a long way recently, however even today there are examples of what our species can achieve when inclined to take a negative route (often a lot more than those of positive aspirations). I truly do hope that humanity reacts positively to interaction with a new sapient being, but it is not beneath our species to act in very damaging fashion.
133309
Rowan DeBues
Posted almost 3 years ago
Instead of old age homes and orphanages in separate facilities, the combination of both should be built.
Must say, this is quite a remarkable idea that I think could work. Would work as a double edged sword to eliminating youth disrepect to elders and the oft forgotten opposite. It saddens me when walking at dusk or at night when an elderly woman sees me walking down the street and crosses the road the moment she sees me. As mentioned below, the only possible downside is the effect that constant death could have on the kids. Who knows, it could also have the adverse effect and make children grow up less effected by death and better equipped to come to grips with the idea themselves. I would lean towards endorsing this idea; it not only provides both parties with company in a situation which is often a lonely one, but it would also provide a sense of family (again to both groups) which may have been lost. Also would continue that beautiful cycle of wisdom from old to young and back again. I am hardly that old myself but have been struck dumb before being taught a lesson by someone a third of my age.
133309
Rowan DeBues
Posted almost 3 years ago
How do you feel about the responsibility of the government towards the young people (18-25) regarding the economic and financial crisis?
A quotation I came across in regard to subject: "People always criticize the youth of today, but they always forget who raised it!" Doesn't answer the question, but it is sometimes enough to silence the ignorant critic. Speaking on a more productive and progressive level; I agree with the sentiment expressed by Hanne. What do you do when you find a lost person? You help them out and point them in the right direction. Rarely do things "un-lose" themselves. I don't think we are going to see a mass revolution as there is simply too much apathy prevalent through society, and it isn't just my "lost generation". Why does it matter if we are apathetic given we are not the people running things. People blame problems in the world today on youth apathy but how can a bunch of bored youngsters be blamed for a world they have no control over! If we had a greater stake in the world; if we had a means to let ourselves be heard outside of twitter and outside of facebook then perhaps different things would be said about youth. My final thought; since when were youth not apathetic. It is the nature of being young, we want to enjoy freedom before debt and commitment role in. The 60s saw youth stand up, but when else in history have youth been seen worldwide as a globally recognized body? We are an unfinished article, give us ten years and mark my words this generation will produce some fantastic people (some of which are already emerging) and influence this world just as greatly (if not greater) than any before us, but stop expecting miracles and great feats of stature from a bunch of people who are still learning how to live away from home. Each generation goes through this stage, so why is it a big deal right now?
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Rowan DeBues
Posted almost 3 years ago
We can learn by exchanging and discussing our own lists of "10 Things I Know to be True."
Let's start of nice and corny... 1. Everyone needs at least a little bit of love. 2. Sometimes optimism doesn't trump despair, sometimes love does not defeat hate, and unfortunately good does not always vanquish evil, but if you don't do anything then the result is a foregone conclusion. 3. You share at least one interest or trait with everyone in the world, regardless of background or belief. 4. Drawing from 3; all humans are born equal, and it is the actions of an individual that should shape their legacy and reputation. 5. Food is good (in healthy quantities that is). 6. Truth can and does change with time. 7. Humanity is inherently. 8. To me, women and love will always be complicated, call it a flaw of mine. 9. Music can effect humans universally. 10. I cannot think of anymore cheesy statements at this present time due to the beer pong game going on in my res invading my hearing...