Danny Province

University of Central Missouri
Warrensburg, MO, United States

About Danny

Bio

I had a troubled childhood that thrust me into philosophical study early in life. I've done great deals of research in public policy, politics, sociology, and religion with an emphasis on cross-cultural comparison as well as my general philosophical studies. My best skills are critical thinking-related, most specifically aptitude. I also have a reputation for fair-mindedness, perseverance, and general strength of character.

An idea worth spreading

Being justified is up on a pedestal. We don't need to knock it down, just lower it an inch or two.

I'm passionate about

Recognizing the subconscious tides that people en masse tend to get carried away by without realizing it.

Talk to me about

things that need to be done; I'd always prefer to work for someone that asked me to help than seeking out someone to help. I generally dislike the larger population, and that is my way of screening.

Comments & conversations

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Danny Province
Posted almost 3 years ago
Why evolution could never solve aging?
If I remember correctly, the most recent research points to aging not being a natural, self contained process. That is to say, if a person existed in a vaccum after the age of 24, their body would change very little from then on. What I remember was that for evolution, growing old is actually an external pressure, where things like bacteria and UV rays and such cause increasing damage to the bodies of living organisms. This gets confused with the natural growth from child into adult which is encoded into our DNA. So in that sense, evolution can't select out the aging process, the aging process is an external pressure evolution uses to do the selecting.
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Danny Province
Posted almost 3 years ago
What alternatives are there to the current economic system? Should global capitalism fail, what would be the best model to replace it?
That's not a good argument. The reason the economy at large suffered is because finance is the blood of the economic organs. The shock to the financial industry was like an economic heart attack, so the whole body went into shock and money immediately flowed to mainly the most 'vital' parts as determined by some ingrained idea that has evolved over time; in this case everyone kept their own money in their own pocket, because this Randian deregulation that allowed the crisis was driven by that value system in the first place. Additionally, the "tent cities" are, at least in the U.S., an entirely contrived media spectacle. Many people may have lost homes, but they are not the people showing up in the tent cities. Since OWS is predominantly anarchist, I'll use their term: those tent cities are a "simulacrum" of truth. They do not deserve the name given to the tent cities of the great depression, which were predominantly homeless people gathering together so they could be seen by society, because we are talking about ideological warriors masquerading as "the 99%". No matter how 'right' they might be, acting is still just acting.
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Danny Province
Posted almost 3 years ago
What alternatives are there to the current economic system? Should global capitalism fail, what would be the best model to replace it?
Economic model debates are too broad for my liking. The ills of economics very rarely find that all their necessary and sufficient conditions come from the model. Industrial agriculture's cruelty to animals is a problem in both the capitalist and communist model. Forced labor is an issue with indentured servitude of capitalism as well as central economic planning in state capitalism and communism. Colonialism certainly isn't limited to any particular model. Trust-fund kids are just as much of free-riders as welfare queens. I think the hard truth is that economic problems are the result of limited resources & a need to distribute them + the intent to game the system + value differences that become ideological causes (such as criticizing stock trading for being too easy for the amount of money it generates). So I don't know what the point of changing an economic model is, because it seems that no model change has the nuances to solve any problems.
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Danny Province
Posted almost 3 years ago
Since oxytocin can influence trust, is it possible to use it for manipulation? Can "the moral molecule" be used for immoral purposes?
If you've ever had someone you don't agree with insist on shaking your hand, that is exactly what happened. Personal contact triggers production of oxytocin, which contributes to feelings of personal investment. Some people who viciously hate someone walk away from a first meeting shocked at how they feel after-the-fact. The oxytocin plays a role in that.
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Danny Province
Posted almost 3 years ago
How do you feel about the responsibility of the government towards the young people (18-25) regarding the economic and financial crisis?
Well by all means lets just throw out any ideas with flaws, because really the world is a utopia for our ideas. I get it, some people have unique advantages. Guess what, I don't care. Just because of that is not a reason to throw away the idea of meritocracy; and it certainly doesn't mean POTUS don't think of the U.S. as one. To achieve a meritocracy doesn't mean you have to strike down the unfair advantages that other people have, you just have to create a starting point for everyone that is capable of making them competitive. In America, that traditionally meant being able to go out on the frontier and then later became the idea of quality public education. So long as people aren't REQUIRED to have this kind of birth-right competitive edge to attain class mobility, then the fundamental idea of meritocracy works. Talking about how some made-up purist form of meritocracy "destroys itself" because parents help their children is a bordering-on-pathetic strawman. Just throwing your hands up in the air also only further entrenches the kind of caste system you are talking about.
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Danny Province
Posted almost 3 years ago
How do you feel about the responsibility of the government towards the young people (18-25) regarding the economic and financial crisis?
If America is still a meritocracy, than there is very little the other generations should do to help people once they are out of the education system. Meritocracy only works when people a) have roughly equivalent opportunities in life and b) are rewarded for the merit they demonstrate. Both of those have been crushed by generational theft through the university system. The private sector and the government (in the U.S.) have agreed that workers should now be forced to pay for the development of their own skills necessary to work. A vicious combination of moving the burden to students and making colleges increasingly for-profit (generally not the purpose they were founded for) has led to speculative/predatory lending, too much access and credential inflation. This is a problem with schooling in-media-res, the damage is done once you have had to go through the system. The idea that "we need to be saved" is selfish, its dwelling on the suffering we've already endured instead of fixing the problem for others. In short, this has to be about fixing that system for the future, not rectifying the present. Debt forgiveness is about all you can hope for, but that won't help people who were deferred from college due to cost or the possible unfairness of wealthy families *paying* for better credentials for their kids. Let go of the problem of now, work on tomorrow.