Stuart Gall

Marathon, Greece

About Stuart

Areas of Expertise

IT - System Integration, Mathematics (BA)

Universities

Open University (UK)

Comments & conversations

132503
Stuart Gall
Posted almost 3 years ago
What's one thing you wish you had learned in school?
This is interesting, sex-ed is taught well before the age of consent. (Well it is in Europe) around 14 I think. It makes sense kids want to know where they come from. So perhaps there is a bias because of the age issue. Perhaps schools should re-visit sex-ed around 17 or so.
132503
Stuart Gall
Posted almost 3 years ago
What's one thing you wish you had learned in school?
I wish I had been taught how to learn. I have my own children in school now and it strikes me that schools just dish out information and the children are left to their own devices as to how they remember it. Evolution - properly with nothing left out. Game theory EDIT: Try to be a little better each day. “The man who moves a mountain begins by carrying away small stones.”
132503
Stuart Gall
Posted almost 3 years ago
Why is visual literacy discouraged in most cultures & WHAT CAN WE DO to change that?
Moreover, the actual quality of the drawing is irrelevant. Just as the only requirements for ones notes is that one can read them the same is true for graphic notes. Plus it does not have to be sketches, islands of text in boxes with arrows between them, geometrical shapes, different colors. Whatever works. Children should be encouraged to take notes in any format that works for them. The only way to do that is to show the class 4 or 5 examples of "non linear" note taking and let each student adopt a personal system that works for them.
132503
Stuart Gall
Posted almost 3 years ago
Why is visual literacy discouraged in most cultures & WHAT CAN WE DO to change that?
I have 3 children 5,9,12 and I am amazed at how easily they can learn a Playstation Game, or learn all the types of pokemon their evolved forms. Then how difficult it is for them to learn anything at school. The types of pokemon and their evolved forms ISTM has very similar meta data structure to the chemical elements. So if a child can learn all the classes of pokemon they should easily be able to learn the periodic table and the group of each element, because it is simpler. But this is not the case. I have come to the conclusion that the way information is presented to them at school is no longer compatible with children. (Assuming it ever was). I think education should shrug off all this "Playing Computer games" and "Watching too much TV" is bad, and take a LONG HARD look at what works, what form of presentation makes information easy for a child to absorb. We have the technology, advertisers know 100% how to get information into a child's mind. Give me history on a DVD, in cartoon format, let the kid watch it 20 times like they do with every other DVD they will learnt up, down, and sideways. Give me maths on a PS3 game where you have to get to level 10 to pass the year.
132503
Stuart Gall
Posted almost 3 years ago
I have an ethical question. Is it wrong to use placebos?
The problem with what you are suggesting is that there is evidence that the placebo effect is reduced if the placebo is less believable. I read that in medical trials they use placebos with mild side effects because patients with such placebos have an enhanced placebo effect. So if the actual treatment under test has side effects you must have the same level of placebo effect. Otherwise you can't be sure that it wasn't just an enhanced placebo effect. The same goes for economic placebos, the more a person pays the more likely it is to work (Unfortunately)
132503
Stuart Gall
Posted almost 3 years ago
I have an ethical question. Is it wrong to use placebos?
I think there are many examples of the power of the mind to overcome obstacles with the use of a placebo. There is definitely evidence of placebos helping medical conditions possibly by reducing stress and allowing the body to better cure its self. So I would ask the opposite question. If you have a placebo and by some means you could be sure that the placebo would help cure a person. Or in your question if a person has a negative outlook and you know that some placebo will help them. Is it ethical NOT to give the placebo. Because if the belief is something is what a person needs, and a placebo will achieve that. Then in actual fact it is not really a placebo. It is a device to effect a physical or mental change by unconventional means. Say a person is taking a homeopathic medicine and getting better from a serious illness. You prove to this person that homeopathy is a scam, they lose their belief, get depressed, and they get ill again. Was that ethical? I believe that many alternate treatments work because they give the patient hope and that allows the bodes own healing to work more effectively. At the end of the day if what a person needs is to believe in something, so that they can believe in themselves I say give them what they need. Successful people often cary a rabbits foot, or a lucky dime, or some other amulet that gives them strength.