Robert Cornell

Louisville, CO, United States

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Robert Cornell
Posted over 2 years ago
Why is visual literacy discouraged in most cultures & WHAT CAN WE DO to change that?
I think one thing I would bring up is, logistically and semantically, there is a difference between graffiti and tagging. Tagging is a form of communication, traditionally used by street gangs, which often times involves an inherent message from the tagger. It is routinely used to mark turf and often involves the taggers Moniker, or street name. It is also used to warn rival gangs, and to market street level drug trade. In contrast, graffiti is more of a form of expression in my experience. While it may involve the individual's moniker, the sheer time which is spent on the creation of this expression generally, lends it to being more than simply marking territory or getting their street name out. Though I've never spoke with any of them to know their exact reasons for the amount of work they put into the creation of their particular mark. Dylan Jones quoted this on his blog, which he cited from http://www.huntfor.com/arthistory/C20th/graffiti.htm. He highlighted the final paragraph which I thought stated well what I was attempting to say as well. "The difference between tagging and graffiti is arguable, but some say it's a clear one: tagging is gang-motivated and/or meant as vandalism (illegal) or viewed as too vulgar or controversial to have public value; while graffiti can be viewed as creative expression, whether charged with political meaning or not." Dylan Jones on http://www.ecademy.com/node.php?id=82981 My goal is not to make this a discussion about tagging vs graffiti, but seeing that the two terms were being interchanged above, and having dealt with both in my career, I felt some clarification couldn't hurt.
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Robert Cornell
Posted over 2 years ago
Why is visual literacy discouraged in most cultures & WHAT CAN WE DO to change that?
This is interesting in that I guess I didn't realize it was being discouraged. I have but recently come into contact with RSAnimate, which I find an absolutely amazing and captivating way of transmitting ideas. So much so I am looking at developing some courses I am working on to incorporate more visual. I was also just watching to a TED presentation by Bruce Schneier, in which he made the statement "we are also a species of story tellers. We respond to stories more than data." This idea is driving what I'm working on in this very moment, and why I find this interesting that this is some how being discouraged. One thing which comes to mind, which Emmie Thomas stated in her post regarding the possibility of visual language being missing due to the difficulty in acquiring the skills to present it effectively. I too have to wonder if sheer presentation of an idea is easier in a non-visual format for many people. I know several people who are artistically inclined and who design things of beauty with a skill I don't even come close to having. For me, not having this advanced skill level has, in the past, caused me to hold back on even considering visual presentation of some of my ideas. But as I move forward with this project I am working on, I absolutely not only see the need, but the power of a strong visual component to the learning process. I have to wonder if there is a way to create a easy to use interface where people can display their ideas visually. First thing which comes to mind is mind-mapping. This concept has changed my life when it comes to how I approach the development of my ideas. Maybe accessibility to resources which make visual presentation easier would help.