Amy Lockwood

Chief of Staff, University of California San Francisco - Global Health Sciences
San Francisco, CA, United States

About Amy

Bio

After several years as a management consultant with a focus on brand strategy, Amy abandoned a corporate career to explore the world of international development. She first worked for the Clinton Foundation leading the Global Pediatric HIV/AIDS Program through which she partnered with several non-governmental organizations and governments to double the number of children receiving life-saving treatment in just over a year. Amy lives in San Francisco, where she is enjoying the wonders of the Bay Area, joyfully practicing yoga, and working as the Chief of Staff for the Institute for Global Health Delivery and Diplomacy, the AIDS Research Institute, and the Office of the UN Special Envoy for Tuberculosis within the University of California San Francisco's Global Health Sciences.

TED Conferences

TEDGlobal 2011, TEDGlobal 2010, TEDIndia 2009

Areas of Expertise

Global Health, International Travel, Branding, Project Management

I'm passionate about

Getting things done. Talking is great, because it generates ideas. Ideas are fantastic because they are the root of change. But, action...ACTION is what actually makes a difference.

Talk to me about

Rethinking international development by practically applying business tools, starting with using market research to understand what beneficiaries (who are really consumers) really want and need.

People don't know I'm good at

Baking and candy making.
Cartwheels and handstands.
Drawing on white boards.

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

70865
Amy Lockwood
Posted over 2 years ago
Amy Lockwood: Selling condoms in the Congo
Thanks for the comments both. I agree, it doesn't take guts to go to the DRC, as it is lovely and the people are wonderful. (note: it's sad to hear about the issues in the Kivus again now, but, there is instability in many regions of the world at any one time.) But, because it is not known well, it is scary for many people.
70865
Amy Lockwood
Posted over 2 years ago
Amy Lockwood: Selling condoms in the Congo
Jack. Thanks for your comment. I'm sorry that my message didn't work for you. It sounds like you have strong opinions that may be based in some experience, so let me assure you that I actually do spend time in Africa, have an education and read the African press. I have worked for and with NGOs who know the score there. It is from that perspective that this talk was written. I was attempting to get people to think about what customers need, want, and believe by listening to them. This is generally called market research and in my opinion too little of it is done and done well in the context of aid agencies.
70865
Amy Lockwood
Posted over 2 years ago
Ernesto Sirolli: Want to help someone? Shut up and listen!
This is a beautiful talk. I think that it is difficult for people to listen to things that make them feel bad or make them confront pain, suffering and injustice. These difficult conversations are the most important to have, with active listening, so that we can acknowledge the painful situation and then move forward to find solutions together. Without that acknowledgement, the solutions can be elusive. So, the question is, how can we support one another to sit with the discomfort that comes up so we can be fully present?
70865
Amy Lockwood
Posted almost 4 years ago
Amy Lockwood: Selling condoms in the Congo
Dipoko, this is a great point. There certainly is need to share information about the need for protection against diseases and unwanted pregnancies. It's complex. Recognizing this complexity is important because it will lead to more effective messages that change behavior in ways that are positive for people. One way of understanding the complexity better is to really understand the end-users. But this is difficult to balance, especially for implementing organizations, with the need to respond to donor perspectives and priorities.
70865
Amy Lockwood
Posted almost 4 years ago
Amy Lockwood: Selling condoms in the Congo
Thanks for the additional data Ben. I think it's always good to question information, and data about this part of the world is often challenging to come by. For clarification: The source I used for the "300 miles of paved road" figure was a NYT article from March of 2007, so perhaps that is outdated. It's referred to on the FINCA website as well: http://www.finca.org/site/c.6fIGIXMFJnJ0H/b.6088539/k.1190/Democratic_Republic_of_the_Congo.htm The source I used for the comment that DRC is the largest country in SSA was an old version of the CIA world factbook and I see now that it this is incorrect. My apologies. I'm guessing it's now the 2nd largest country, since the independence of South Sudan in July, but haven't seen the area figures on that.
70865
Amy Lockwood
Posted over 4 years ago
The World’s Smallest Stop-motion Character Animation
The most awe inspiring part of this product isn't shown. Using cellscope technology, a cellphone can be used as a mobile microscope. That's not just cool, it's potentially lifesaving, game changing for health care in rural areas, under resourced systems and much of the developing world. With this technology, it is possible to view samples, take a photograph of the sample and send it to an expert for analysis. That means that a sick patient doesn't have to travel to the main hospital in the city so that their blood or sputum can be examined by the only lab with the right human resources and equipment to find out what's wrong. Granted, health care workers need to be trained to collect samples, prepare slides and use this technology, but that is much easier than becoming a lab technician. So, while they've got a Guniness Record for the smallest stop motion, I wish they would also get this into the hands of people so we can celebrate a world record for testing and treating the most people for malaria, TB and other infections in hard to reach places so they can enjoy the entertainment value of this device as well.
70865
Amy Lockwood
Posted almost 5 years ago
Julian Assange: Why the world needs WikiLeaks
I am grateful to be part of this discussion. While I agree that EVERYONE is qualified to tell the truth, I am sensitive that TRUTH is a relative term. I wish it were not so, but it is clear to me in big and small ways, everyday that the way I see the world and YOU see the world are different. Even while trying to ensure what you say is FACTUAL, there is always CONTEXT, which one might not understand or be able to effectively communicate to others. Furthermore, I am not convinced by this talk that the efforts being made by Wikileaks is ENOUGH to ensure that the information is FACTUAL. When discussing the Albanian well blow out for example, JA says that they put out information even though they were skeptical about it. Now, granted they highlighted their lack of certainty and then got the confirmation they needed, but I'm not sure that is good enough. What if it hadn't turned out that way? If the "feeling" wasn't on? I'm not sure the answer, but it is a question to consider.
70865
Amy Lockwood
Posted almost 5 years ago
Julian Assange: Why the world needs WikiLeaks
The balance between freedom of the press and national security is one that has garnered much attention throughout history for very good reason. It's not clear, and depends on your perspective, what information should be accessible by all. I find myself pulled in both directions and worried about sliding down EITHER slippery slope. Freedom of speech and the press creates a transparency is necessary in order to hold leaders accountable. However, information that protects national security and keeps both citizens and soldiers safe from harm requires a special protection. Since there are no hard and fast rules here, my concern is, WHO gets to decide. Is it a government, an organization, an individual? Is Julian Assange qualified? How? Why? This talk was BY FAR the most controversial at TEDGlobal. Controversy at the event and now in this forum will lead to incredibly insightful and powerful debate and conversation, which can only be a positive thing.