Nawaf Alnaji

Qatif, Saudi Arabia

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Nawaf Alnaji
Posted over 2 years ago
Roger McNamee: 6 ways to save the internet
Actually, the mobile OS war is totally different. iOS is equivalent to Macintosh (closed and integrated), but Android isn't equivalent to neither Windows nor Linux. It has the success of Windows along with the company support, but it's Open source. Android is the closest thing to the mobile equivalent of Windows in the desktop OS war, as they are both fragmented and supported by most hardware companies. But I believe one of the things that make Android better in the mobile war than Windows was in the desktop war is that it's open source. This allows it to have the benefits of Linux, and it also allows each company to have a different Android interface. This saves Android from falling into becoming like Windows computers: almost completely identical.
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Nawaf Alnaji
Posted over 2 years ago
How can creatives use new technologies to increase empathy across cultural and geographic distances?
Good point. Movies can make a really big difference. The problem with the global culture regarding movies (and music) right now is that it's very focused on the US (though sometimes it also includes UK and Canada). This creates lots of empathy and understanding toward Americans. If we reach a point when it's normal to have movies from all around the world in our local cinema, instead of just local and American movies, we will reach a high point of empathy, tolerance, and understanding between cultures. Now, almost all non-American movies are shown in only their country.
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Nawaf Alnaji
Posted almost 3 years ago
Should we teach kids how to make programs instead of how to use them?
"Because not everyone will require programming skills to manoeuvre through life." Just like not everyone will require physics, biology, or chemistry. That applies on almost all classes. It's not about what they require. It's about what will benefit them greatly. You're not looking at the bigger picture. If an entire generation knows how to program, and they are using programs every day since childhood, imagine what would that cause. It'll be a revolution. Look at the thousands of programmers now who are programming for free from their homes. Just look at the mod and white hat hacker communities, from Linux to Android to Kinect to practically anything that uses code. The things done by those communities are already amazing. Now imagine the possibilities when thousands of teens join in. As for interest and inclination, they already teach programming to all students in some high schools. All I'm asking is that they teach it more and at an earlier age. And I actually think many who believe they don't like it have never tried it. Look at the statistic I put in my other comment. There are more kids that would like programming than we think.
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Nawaf Alnaji
Posted almost 3 years ago
Should we teach kids how to make programs instead of how to use them?
BUT THEY ALREADY KNOW HOW TO USE PROGRAMS. I don't know a single 12-18 year old who doesn't know how to make a powerpoint presentation, regardless whether or not he was taught so in school. We're computer fluent. Of course I'm not suggesting that to make a presentation the student will have to program a presentation program. I'm only talking about what they should be taught in computer class in school, which is definitely not powerpoint and word processors.
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Nawaf Alnaji
Posted almost 3 years ago
Should we teach kids how to make programs instead of how to use them?
Of course there are thousands of programs and applications that an average 11 year old has never used. But there are also hundreds of other programs and applications that they have used. It really doesn't make a big difference. They've seen and used different programs. The only way knowing millions programs instead of a hundred is if they already know how to program (you get ideas for codes). Using different programs when they don't know how to program really doesn't make that much of a difference when they already use lots of programs already. Some programmers even made great programs back in the 80s, when there were much fewer programs and they were much less familiar with using computers.
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Nawaf Alnaji
Posted almost 3 years ago
Should we teach kids how to make programs instead of how to use them?
Although it will be nice and preferable to teach kids things they enjoy a lot, this is not really necessary from the beginning. They just need to not hate it. I'm not a programmer so I don't really know how the curriculum can go. Considering your thought, they might start learning a programming language like Python, and then later on they start learning more complex languages. Once they like programming in itself, they'll start getting excited for learning more complex languages. Eventually they'll have a wide knowledge of different languages.
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Nawaf Alnaji
Posted almost 3 years ago
It's a wonderful life in so many ways because of Steve Jobs. What would the world be like if he were never born?
Steve Jobs had a bigger effect than most people. Windows wouldn't have existed if he didn't create first Apple II then Macintosh. Apple II was the first "true" personal computer. Macintosh was the second graphic UI computer, after Lisa, which was also invented by Steve Jobs. Imagine life without a graphic UI computer. Most people wouldn't use a computer at all, or use one only at work. Billions of people all around the world are using computers because they are easy and comfortable to use. Sure, maybe Gates would've made the graphic UI anyway, or maybe someone else would have done so. That's a big "if" though. I might be overestimating him, but I see that Steve Jobs is the single most influential person in the 21st century. Why? because he turned a professional machine to a casual gadget everyone can use, and everyone did. It happened first with the PC, then he made the second revolution (much, much smaller than the PC, but still important) with the iPhone. The iPhone started the smartphone revolution, in which he saw smartphones as small computers instead of advanced telephones. Now, people are connected 24/7 through their smartphones. I might use a Windows PC and an Android smartphone, but I know that without Steve Jobs they wouldn't probably exist. I would probably not be writing this from my computer either, that is, if I would actually have a computer.