Nicholas Thompson

Mapleton, UT, United States

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Nicholas Thompson
Posted almost 4 years ago
Post your top 5 N-grams here!
http://ngrams.googlelabs.com/ngrams/graph?content=John+Lennon%2CPaul+McCartney%2C+Ringo+Star%2C+George+Harrison%2C+The+Beatles&year_start=1940&year_end=2008&corpus=0&smoothing=0 Poor Ringo.
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Nicholas Thompson
Posted almost 4 years ago
All educational administrators, consultants, college professors must teach a class in a public school at least once a year to stay employed
I like the idea of having college professors teach high school level classes, because from my experience college professors are often far better teachers then those we find at the high school level. But I don't know very many who have the time to teach an additional class, and I also don't like the idea of it being a requirement for employment, id much prefer the professors to receive some sort of incentive to teach these classes. What my question is though is would the professors teach a college style class with high school level material? (Ex. Less class time then a regular high school class but more homework) or would they just be a glorified substitute teacher? Id much prefer the first option because it would also expose the high school students to a class that emphasizes personal responsibility to learn and gives a taste for what college will be like. My only other concern would be that although it wouldn't be an "AP" or "Honors" class per se, only students that would be taking classes like that anyways would enroll, meaning it would leave a large chunk of students totally unaffected.
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Nicholas Thompson
Posted almost 4 years ago
Institutions of higher learning say that American high school graduates are not college-ready. How do we close the gap?
I think that it has to come from the home. If you look at the students who are most often successful in school are those who come from homes that stress the importance of education. Also our inability to find sufficient teachers with the skills necessary to teach. In order to find more of these teachers we need to drastically increase the reward for those who teach well. (Teaching well and teaching to the test are not necessarily the same thing and would have to be defined) While firing those who are unable to do so. Another idea is to take the ability to gain tenure from all teachers below the college level, unless there is an odd case of a high school teacher who is actually publishing and doing research, which is the point of tenure.
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Nicholas Thompson
Posted almost 4 years ago
what if instead of forcing kids to go to school right at the age of 5 we waited until they choose to go to school?
Im not sure if your being facetious here but the children of tomorrow aren't going to have a rate of 50% Genius level IQs no matter what we do IQs follow the bell curve for a reason. Now I understand that teaching to the test is in some cases detrimental to students overall learning, but at the same time in subjects like math and science the correct answer is the correct answer, theres no grey area, either the student learns to perform the necessary task or they don't, and testing allows us to see those who are learning and those who aren't. Secondly teaching children how to learn requires two parties, the teacher and the student, to be actively engaged in their work. Meaning only the children who care about education will put in the effort necessary, and only good teachers will be able to communicate these things effectively. So your ideal requires students who care, which is incredibly difficult to teach, and impossible to force, and teachers with skill, which in our current system are often too few and far between. I agree we need to teach children to learn but we can't change the sylabus until we've fixed the system of apathy that we too often find, especially in urban areas, which are the areas in most need of help.
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Nicholas Thompson
Posted almost 4 years ago
what if instead of forcing kids to go to school right at the age of 5 we waited until they choose to go to school?
The US education system is awful i totally agree, but you can't say thats why children would drop out. If this proposal was changed slightly i may agree with it. If it was "instead of forcing children to go to school at 5 we allow the FAMILIES to decide". Because I stand by the fact that most kids and teenager aren't looking far enough in to the future to care. But, those kids who succeed in school are often (not always but usually) the ones whose parents put a high priority on education. Thats is ultimately where education has to be fixed, within the homes. Now thats not to say that you can excuse the system. It is terrible, and there are things they could and should be doing, such as taking on some of the characteristics of those charter schools that succeed in difficult areas like NY and LA, but even in the worst schools a child can be successful if they have a home that pushes them to succeed. As for schools forcing children to conform to the current system your absolutely right. But unfortunately we need to help children to succeed in the current system, whatever that may be because like it or hate thats the system they have to live in.
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Nicholas Thompson
Posted almost 4 years ago
is the conscious brain in the heart & the un conscious brain in the pineal gland ?
The whole brain is responsible for both the unconscious and the conscious mind. Heart beat and breathing is in the brainstem. Fear and anger is largely in the amygdala. Reasoning, and conscious though reside largely in the cerebral cortex. The brain isn't so easily divided as we once hoped. The reference of the pineal gland as the "third eye" i believe is only in reference to certain types of lizards and frogs and its more literally a third eye instead of something more symbolic. That was the long answer, the short one is no our consciousness is far more complex then that