Timm Amstein

Student , TU Dresden
Dresden, Germany

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184157
Timm Amstein
Posted over 1 year ago
Enrique PeƱalosa: Why buses represent democracy in action
Thanks for the talk, but why is your first goal to optimize for mobility and not to minimize the need for people to drive to work, to the shop etc.? Why are you sticking to the model of car based cities where this mobility is required? Please take a look at the european cities and see the difference. Kent Larson presented this in a brilliant way, here at TED. http://www.ted.com/talks/kent_larson_brilliant_designs_to_fit_more_people_in_every_city.html Look at London, look at Paris, Berlin, Madrid or Rome. All of these have their own problems but there is one thing they have in common. If you need something you can walk there. And if you are lucky work is also just 10 minutes away.
184157
Timm Amstein
Posted over 1 year ago
Geraldine Hamilton: Body parts on a chip
Thank you for the inspiring presentation!! I understand that, that's just the beginning of this project but I was asking myself is it really sufficient to test the tissue alone and seperated? I am definetly no expert but when you build up the human-on-a-chip as it is now, isn't it just brainless tissue. I mean if I take a drug its very interesting to know how my cells deal with it. With that information you can make a giant leap in personalized health care, but is it also possible to simulate the proteins and hormones and all the other stuff thats used by our bodys as steering mechanisms? Or is that already apllied? I would compare it with an electric system. Every component may work really fine with given circumstances but thats no guarantee that the whole system won't blow up. Nethertheless its really a perfect example for good design! Thanks for sharing!
184157
Timm Amstein
Posted almost 2 years ago
We need knowledge maps for students and pupils!
I understand your concern and I yust picked these examples to explain the problem. And I thought especially in Google scholar there still exist a database of citations. I thought that could be a good starting point to see if an approach like that could be helpful. I don't expect that there will be much use for it in a professional way, because as you said there will be so much redundancy. But if its promising you could start a big project to create something that gives real relevant information and holds the possibilities for submaps and so on. As you said that project can't rely on existing databases and has to be build from scratch as an open crowdbased project.
184157
Timm Amstein
Posted almost 2 years ago
We need knowledge maps for students and pupils!
I am sorry. I went a little overboard to make my point I think. What I really wanted to say is what you also said. That the technology developed so much and so qiuck that today its much more difficult to be really good in a broad field or said in another way. The field in which somebody can be specialized is getting smaller because you have to learn more. Everyday learning is out of question. My concern is that someday the development of technology will outrun the capabilities of our old crappy system of education if we don't develop new tools and methods.
184157
Timm Amstein
Posted almost 2 years ago
We need knowledge maps for students and pupils!
Thats exactly the concern I have. Because of the information overload and the fact that everybody could wright about nearly anything we need to set things in perspective and see the connection. I don't want to ruin the experience of learning. That doesn't overtake the normal way of learning it's an addition, a new possibility. If you want to take it or not is for you to decide. I think that moment of serendipity you mentioned would be even bigger. Because I you study something and discover something off that interesting. Then, if you ask the questions: What else does that fact lead to? What can I do with that new idea? how does that idea or fact relates to the things I already know? you are alone! You can explore the different subjects on your own like you said or you need something or someone to teach you. Before the internet you could use one or two teaching books to get a basic understanding and then you could move foreward. With the internet and so many sources of information even a good teacher can only scratch the surface. I think especially for student and pupils who have to learn very much, most of the time things they never heard of before, it's essential to give them the opportunity to say. Okay I learn that! and now I want to see every subject thats related to that to decide what to learn next. If you don't do that the information overload will just crush the brains of students. My best example for the is the field of electronics. If you sudied electronics about 40 years ago. After the normal 5 Years in University (typical German "Diplom") you could say "I understand mostly everything there is to know and I am specialized in ..." Today If you want to understand all the hardware, sensors, IC, software and so on build in a single smartphone you have a hard time. And if you want to build one you better have two lifes to learn it all.
184157
Timm Amstein
Posted almost 2 years ago
We need knowledge maps for students and pupils!
I think that your concern is that we have to be able to learn without a preset image and create our own way of understanding a subject. I totally agree with you. I realized that the name knowledge map maybe isn't the right word. I don't wanted to say we need a framework, instead I yust wanted to suggest to provide better information about connections between subjects. For example if I open a wikipedia site I can see information about one selected subject and the links to other subjects. To get a full understanding of the connection I would have to check out all the links and the links that are linked to that and so on. The workload would go to infinity. Also in professional journals; if I want to have a full understanding I would have to read all the cited journals and books. I noticed for expample that google scholar provides the citing information of articles. If you are searching it provides links to the other cited articles. That means the connection information is there but encrypted in lists and links so that after one or two clicks no normal person can really overlook the mess. What I was asking for is visualized this connection data. After that we will see what comes with it. I think especially for students just to see what are the most cited works in a field and how they are connected in an understandable way, would be mindblowing.
184157
Timm Amstein
Posted about 2 years ago
Do you want a united Europe?
A quick wrap up for everybody, who is interested what the outcome of this dicussion was. Sadly, i must say that the general opinion is slightly negative. The reason for that I think is the scepticism if a united europe can be created as an effective state without to much regulation and burocracy. So the real feedback was positive. Most of the europeans, who wrote, were not against the idea but didn't believed it was possible. Other problems mentioned were the dangerousness of a centralized government in connection with the immense size or that the cultural and historical differences are still too large. Our American friends reminded us that we should be careful not to take the same path as they did and that learning from History is absolutly mandatory. I think thats okay because we have to find our own way. We aren't the USA and it's not the 18th century anymore so there is clearly no blueprint to use. So we have to come up with something on our own. To conclude I want to say that if we would demand a poll tomorrow and ask "Europe yes or no" I think the collective answer would be NO, but not because the people don't want, but rather they don't believe it can be done properly. In the end I want to highlight the suggestion of Marcus Cake, who presented a very interesting approach to make it possible. http://is.gd/wnewn Thanks for taking part in this converation.
184157
Timm Amstein
Posted about 2 years ago
Do you want a united Europe?
Yeah, in Germany the resistence is constantly growing mostly because the media use the constant CRISIS Status to get big catatrophic headlines . I think there are many highly determined and enthusiastic people but they are all concerned. And the burocracy in Germany you can call " one of a kind" today so nobody wants to make it more complicated. If think it's also irritating for every german to see that the sympathy abroad is consantly decreasing because of the crisis management driven mostly by our government. Another problem is that due to economic effects Germany does very well despite the crisis. So many people think we should just mind our own problems but I think that is studip because Germany isn't able to stay competetive alone. But thats a fact the penny press is ignoring.
184157
Timm Amstein
Posted about 2 years ago
What to do to become a scientist?
Hello Tarun, the crucial thing to become a scientist is to stay curious all the time. Chemistry especially is a field of try and error. Just try out putting things together (maybe add a little fire^^). If you want motivation and deep philosophical insight how to become a scientist I can recommend you to watch Richard Feynman: http://topdocumentaryfilms.com/pleasure-finding-things-out/ I don't know what kind of access you have to institutions like Colleges/Universities, but if thats a problem try using some of the great MOOC Platforms like: http://i.imgur.com/beXSfOU.jpg With these platforms you have access to very high level education on nearly every subject you can imagine. I can't evaluate edX but I am doing my 5th coursera course these days and it's great because it's so flexible. This option is also usable if your parents will force you to do some mecanical or EEE subject. But even if that happens don't bother with it too much. Because the education on engineering is based on nature science, so you will also start with having mathematics, physics and of course chemistry even if you do mechanical or EEE because you have to know the laws of nature to utilize them properly. After that you can specialise in subjects that are highly correlated to chemistry like material science (mechanical) or the whole subject of nanotechnology (EEE and mechanical). If you got a degree (and hopefully your parents are pleased) and you are still determined to become a full fledged chemist you can change from engineer who knows a lot about chemistry to chemist who knows a lot about engenieering and maybe write your PhD in chemistry. The only things you need to take that path are DETERMINATION and CURIOUSITY. If you got that all the time you will find a way. I hope that was helpful.
184157
Timm Amstein
Posted about 2 years ago
Ultra Theory is basically a fundamental opening of how things work;and what we can do about them. It's time to innovate differently.
I can't find the website ultraon you are citing. Can you please provide some background links for us to understand the concept of ultra theory? Its extremly difficult to understand your arguments and give feedback without knowing what you are referring to. An article or paper which describes the theory for beginners should be sufficient I think. Thank you.