Roman Cieciak

Krakow, Poland

About Roman

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Languages

English, Japanese, Polish

An idea worth spreading

I'd like to see some elements of psychology as a part of curriculum in every school system in the world. Understanding workings of the mind can help learn and socialize from an early age.

Talk to me about

Psychology, cognitive science, hypnosis and anything mind-related.
Physics, computer scince, online learning.
Motivation, inspiration, determination.
Philosophy and morality.

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Comments & conversations

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Roman Cieciak
Posted 3 months ago
Mind exists outside of physical world - will you agree?
Hi Dorian, If you want to unprogram yourself on a deeper level I'd recommend you reading Sequences from LessWrong.com Definitions can be devided in two broad categories: intentional and extentional - the former is about describing things, the latter is about pointing to examples. So you can try and define love with somewhat abstract words or give exaples of little or big gestures that prove love. By the way warmth, touch, effort and so on is how I myself would start defining love. The same way science does not deny existance of God it does not deny existance of love or art or calendar for that matter. With love you can only show physiological arousal and some brain activity patterns. Art is just stone, dead plants and vibrations of air. Calendar is just a culturally accepted construct suited for nature, fitted into the way things happen to be. As for the evidence of God's existance I'd like you to try and find some books or pictures that metion him. Ask people around, go outside of your circle, maybe ask some authorities on the matter like people of the Church. I would argue that God does exist just not where scientists want to not find him, not in the way they expect.
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Roman Cieciak
Posted 3 months ago
Evolution of human language started with singing
Speech has its own melody, we call it intonation, but principally its equivalent to musical modulation, so speaking can be seen as a form of singing also. Writing in itself, especially print, slows or even halts language developement. Cultures that did not develop writing change their language more dynamically and fluidly. Onomatopoeia is not language per se, but it was a form of communication that given time evolved into one. Also by singing I don't mean Regina Spector singin, but more like songbird singing, as we are talking about primitive humanoids. Music as an art very probably started as an expression of joy, you're right and as a part of the culture it influenced language and vice versa. What do you mean Maslov's hierachy of needs?
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Roman Cieciak
Posted 3 months ago
Mind exists outside of physical world - will you agree?
As with majority of tough questions the answer is simple: It does and it doesn't. As an atheist and a sceptic, having some experience with meditation and other mind-state altering approaches and philosophies I must say that mind is not your brain, it is not made of chemicals, atoms or electricity, but it does not exist without it, outside of it, spacially or otherwise. This the diffrence betheen the book and the text, signal and information, processor and process, the fist and the punch. One is concrete, touchable, the other is abstract, but it is an abstraction on the concrete object. Mind is not outside of the physical world but it is not the atoms, it is the movement and interactions between them. It is in the equations of the physicist, in the measurements, not in what is measured.
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Roman Cieciak
Posted 3 months ago
Evolution of human language started with singing
So maybe the singing part was how we transitioned from "Uh-ah" to "It started with onomatopoeia."? Mimicing sounds of nature explains the phonetic part of our language and to some extent morphemic, but singing requires melody and structure and it can be the way those onomatopoeic sounds got organized making for syntactic fundamentals.
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Roman Cieciak
Posted 3 months ago
Evolution of human language started with singing
Occam's razor doesn't seem to be very important if we try to pinpoint the single evolutionary event as the root cause of language emergance and after some consideration I must say that in fact it favours your claim that 'it started as a vocal behavior with some benefitial purpose" as, being more general, it requires less information to validate. But as a hypothesis it doesn't exclude too many possibilities and is hard to disprove, which make it not so good of a hypothesis. Modern humans find singing attractive in one way or another, so it is plausible that our ancestors would find it attractive too. As Pat Gilbert says in a comment above it started with onomatopoeia and mimicing songbirds can be seen even today in tribal societies of Amazonia. For hunting puroses, supporting your thesis not mine, but it's arguably some form of singing.
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Roman Cieciak
Posted 3 months ago
Evolution of human language started with singing
I myself would point the Occams razor as the argument in the other direction, as in the original formulation it states and I paraphrase "do not multiply entities beyond necessity", therefore claiming singular behavior as the origin of language, has less probabilistic entropy then more general claim about rudimentary language. Linguistic behavior conveying things like "I attack from the front..." is still more complex (=less probable) than "I'm cool, let's mate". Finding food is crucially important, but sex is the strongest psychological drive. Studies show that rats prefer sexual stimulation to food.
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Roman Cieciak
Posted 3 months ago
Evolution of human language started with singing
I couldn't agree more. Singing is a very important and useful skill as it helps connect language content with emotion and emotion is very helpful with memory. Music in general is useful for learning. Unfortunately you're missing the point, my focus here is the evolutionary role of singing in the emergence of speech. If it was true it would tell us how deeply rooted melody of vocal behavior is and why it is so important.
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Roman Cieciak
Posted about 1 year ago
Are science & spirituality one and the same?
On the personal level they are all the same thing- they are made of person's beliefs. The diffefence is in the content of those beliefs and their sources. The greates difference between the two is that science in general (on average) makes better, more precise predictions.
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Roman Cieciak
Posted over 1 year ago
What motivates you?
Japanese people have "tsuyoku naritai" which translates "(I) want (to be) stronger". This is the force that drives many of their comic-book characters to overcome more and more difficulties. Not for competition, rivalry or any high purpose, just from the pure will of power for the sake of power alone, where becoming ever stronger is a goal in itself. It is not a goal to be achieved and to be done with. The goal is to always be moving forward, to grow stronger even when theres no one and nothing to compare to. Even when we already surpassed everyone else. This is in my view the ultimate motivation, that once mastered is an unvincible force to push you to accomplish everything you might possibly ever achieve.
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Roman Cieciak
Posted almost 2 years ago
How do the cosmologists account for the time gap of the distant galaxies' images?
The question is how do we account for the time gap between distant objects measured. As you say "The Shift towards Red is greater at further distances because the further we look out we see those objects moving away from us faster than ones closer to us." but those objects are also more distant in time. Their red-shifted light was emitted earlier than the light of those closer objects.