Yuanyuan Ji

Chengdu, China

About Yuanyuan

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Bio

a punk at heart, a down-to-earth doer, an ordinary teacher, a life-long learner, a girl who wants to be a better person to better her society.

I'm passionate about

music (especially progressive rock, metal, folk, post-rock), film, cybercultures, psychology, Nietzsche and Camus, short-distance running, drawing

Favorite talks

Comments & conversations

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Yuanyuan Ji
Posted 11 months ago
Rita Pierson: Every kid needs a champion
Well, Ronda, god knows I know how you feel. Teaching is indeed a HARD job and there're always people who don't understand and don't give a s**t about what teachers do. But I feel like us teachers have to stand our ground and keep some faith, that's probably what's left for us, what distiguishes us from those "administrators" that we dislike in the end.
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Yuanyuan Ji
Posted 11 months ago
Rita Pierson: Every kid needs a champion
Awesome talk! Being a teacher myself I've come across so many "tough" kids as Rita mentioned, I've met more intelligent and nice ones. I insist that there's no student with no hope, there are just so many teachers and policy makers that lost patience and belief in education and connection. Keep dealing with problems and keep offering kids something promising, that's what I said.
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Yuanyuan Ji
Posted about 1 year ago
Shabana Basij-Rasikh: Dare to educate Afghan girls
I'm an educator in China where there're still so many village girls abandoned by their parents because of gender discrimination even today. Education can change their destinies but they don't even have the slightest chance. I have no idea what my country will become if only more women could get the access to education, even higher education; to be able to strive for their own dreams instead of doing what they're told by the partriarchal society. Like Shanaba, I also believe that what's in our mind truly matters. Well done, Shanaba!
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Yuanyuan Ji
Posted over 1 year ago
Tony Porter: A call to men
Actually, being stuck in this "man box" will not only harm women at large, but would backfire men at the same time, at one point of their lives. In China young men are prescribed with the obligation to purchase decent houses for the fiancees and whether a man can fulfill this "task" pretty much becomes the criteria of a "winner" instead of a loser (where we call "diaosi" in China). This not only brought out debates on whether Chinese women are mostly material girls but also put great pressure upon men. This is a social problem in China, a place where Tony's "man box" fully functions. But what sinks me into deeper thinking is that, many women subconsciously consider themselves to be inferior and weaker in both physical and social senses and make this into their priviledge of enjoying men's preferential treatment, and this in turn encourages men to be more dominating, self-righteous and biased. I whole-heartedly agree with Mcleester's point that "men can only be free and full persons when women are free and full persons".
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Yuanyuan Ji
Posted over 2 years ago
Yang Lan: The generation that's remaking China
I go along with your views, especially what you said in the second paragraph. This is also an issue I concern and have thought about for quite a while. I feel that China is only opening economically, we still have a long way to go to foster our "brand" culturally. It's not just carrying cultural tradition forward, but also creating new ones. To compare with our neighbor Japan we could easily see the distance. Then again, to boost national culture is not a simple issue, it needs to be backed by healthy market, sound regulations and more lenient cultural environment...and this leads to another complex issue again lol
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Yuanyuan Ji
Posted over 2 years ago
Yang Lan: The generation that's remaking China
the selection of the topic is very good, and timely, I shall say. The power of social media in China has been acknowledged by many scholars and media observers and indeed, microblog, blog and social networking sites are all playing the role of an "alternative" media outlet that could counterbalance the otherwise totally exclusive media enviroment. I would say these social media are not just tools, they're almost a kind of lifestyle to Chinese urban youth, something they resort to to confirm their identity and power. But beware of two things: first, the lack of regulation of online discourse and the following consequence; second, the tendency of slacktivism which may replace the motivation of real actions. And indeed, like someone commented previously, Chinese problem is so very complex, let's not hope a single generation could change the whole situation, let's hope that joint efforts from two or more generations could make this society a better one.
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Yuanyuan Ji
Posted over 2 years ago
Lauren Zalaznick: The conscience of television
I think it's a two-way street, it's like each reinforcing the other. Don't forget that profit drives TV programs (great majority) today, and what are people really interested to watch? Dark side of the moon. I think many TV programs today do reflect the bad things people do (or the adults do), and they usually repackaging them in a moral ambiguity (or moral relativity) and selling them to the society at large (needless to say children are the most susceptible). All in all it boils down to one plain fact: human have devils inside and media are readily amplifying and disseminating them.