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Iankovsky Popadic

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why does the Libyan revolution look as a failure?

The Arab waves of revolution carried away Kadhafi's rule. However, according to some analysts, this country was doomed to further divisions once the common ennemy was no longer there. This week, the Eastern part of Libya declared itself independent. And it wants to be able to decide over its own destiny. In all this move, the NTC in Tripoli accused foreign forces to be behind such a separation. Can we say that we need another revolution to unite Libya or is it good the way it is with the East separated from the West? Can we say that the common front that was fought to topple down Kadhafi is soon forgotten? Or really there is foreign powers who want to use the old way 'divide-to-rule' so that they can exploit the wealth hidden in the East? What is the way forward now?

Topics: geopolitics
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  • Mar 11 2012: Because the US and NATO kicked over the hornet's nest... and left. If you think about it, this is the central argument behind nation-building. After you destroy a country, Should you stay and help them reform into something more peaceful and (in many cases) try to help them into the 21st century? Obviously leftwing pressure forced Bush to sign the withdrawal date as early as he did. We may still be leaving to early... but Iraq had our protection while it got its act together; so they stayed intact. (Notice, though, that Kurdistan is breaking away because Baghdad is still mired in factional politics.) Afghanistan had a lot of freedom and purple fingers under our protection... but to be honest, the best thing that happened to Afghanistan was Iraq - it drew most of the fighting there.

    I'm not a warmonger by any means; but I do not suffer dictators lightly. I think the Axis of Evil was well-named, and there are countries who's citizens would probably be better off if they were invaded, despite the tolls in human life. Is ending the misery in North Korea worth it? And you have to admit, Iraq is not threatening any of its neighbors anymore and, despite its problems, was left pretty much untouched by the arab spring - meaning, its people are generally hopeful.

    I guess a good way to look at it is that you shouldn't go toppling other people's governments; but if you do... you're obligated to nurture them until they can stand again. And if you don't, they will continue to break down into smaller and smaller groups until the fighting stops. It's chaos theory and entropy at work.
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      Mar 11 2012: The question referrs to the current situation in Libya!
      • Mar 16 2012: Well, yes.... the question is why does the "Libyan revolution look like a failure". I'll just put it like this: Libya looks like a failure because we DIDN'T do the dirty work of nation-building. So Iraq vs Libya can be seen as a contrast of the two methods of dictator removal... with or without nation building. Libya is failing for precisely the reasons Iraq didn't - but may yet still, because we may have left too early. Iraq may fail because we've essentially taken the Libyan approach to it.

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