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Nicholas Lukowiak

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Western culture is wasteful. Is it fair to suggest that most people have to ask themselves what is worth more: luxuries or the future?

Phones last up to a year, rarely fixed to be reused.

Most restaurant franchises and corporations supply more waste than small countries.

Car companies come out with new models every year.

Oil... enough said

Recycling is more of a fade then it is a requirement.

When is enough damage enough?

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    Mar 6 2011: I refuse to see this question as a simple either-or. It is perfectly conceivable that we can maintain our current lifestyles with 'luxuries' like healthcare, education, comfortable homes, entertainment, varied diets, etc. by innovation and invention. Resources are limited only because humankind is still quite inefficient at acquiring and employing them to the fullest. I look forward to a future in which all people have the same luxuries we currently enjoy and more.
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      Mar 7 2011: It isn't simple but it is either-or; if people do not realize their life styles are destructive then they will not care. Their lack of caring will be the ultimate demise of the planet, slippery slope? Maybe. Humankind only problem is humans that reinforce ideas. If you never change the idea there is no change. When will people notice and ask themselves if it worth exploiting the planet for luxury. Resources are not limited people reinforcing traditional ideas are limiting progress for profit margins. There is no money in cars that run on sun and electricity. If people cared for such products someone would have to make it.

      You're luxuries are slightly better than necessary life needs. I believe most would consider luxuries as being rich and having extra, and not as having just enough to be happy, because the idea of what will make you happy i believe is also distorted for most.

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