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Abhishek Rudhrabhattla

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Even though there are many developed countries, why does poverty still exist?

UNO declares that still there exists 47% poverty across the globe even though many countries are declared as the developed. As soon as the great word and fear so called"RECESSION" hits the market, many are loosing the jobs. Why cannot this so developed countries or developing countries could not sustain the market at this odd times?

Topics: Recession
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  • Dec 11 2011: While it may be easiest to blame the developed countries for their unwillingness to share and help, it is also a problem at the base level of these undeveloped countries governments/societies. In the middle east, severe radical religious beliefs can easily hinder the advancement of something, especially an idea that would help the people. These places have a very hard time getting organized, or even thinking for themselves.

    It's our job as humans to bridge the gap between poverty and happiness. We as people can provide things for other countries that they have never dreamed of. If enough people got together and thought about how to provide clean water to the entire Earth, I'm sure it'd be possible. The main priority isn't others unfortunately, but rather our own lives that we must worry about.

    I still think the Earth has much more learning to do.
    • Dec 15 2011: I don't concur although you have a good point that it is not rooted in the developed countries' unwillingness to help.

      Under-developed countries come in a myriad of different religious beliefs(or without religious beliefs) controlling the state but they all have the same problems. The world does not need to be a bit more atheistic to be efficient.

      I think that some religions actually help in raising the state of a nation when followed correctly. We do have responsibilities to others but I cannot agree to Adam Smith's "infallible" self-interest theory. I actually believe that what has happened in the under-developed areas is a worst case scenario of self-interest.

      Yes, under-developed countries have much to learn but it doesn't mean that developed countries don't. We're all in this together but bashing religions is not the way to start recruiting people to a good cause. There must be something to do that doesn't require leaving religion that can improve their lot. Why don't we start with that?