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Tarek Seif el nasr

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Which books have inspired you the most?

There are millions of books but there only a few that could really inspire you

Topics: books
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  • Nov 21 2011: I may have inadvertently sent in a partial list earlier so I will make a second stab at responding to the query now.

    These are books that I've read over past fifty or so years, not necessarily in the order listed, that gave me pause to consider the world I'm inhabiting and those who share it with me. I came by some by chance, the others as assigned reading and still others on a whim just because I was aware of the authors. There are many others, of course, but these are the ones that stirred my curiosity or caused me to rethink some previous notions I might not otherwise have questioned or given much thought to.

    "All Quiet On the Western Front" Remarque
    "Johnny Got His Gun" Trumbo
    "Man's Search for Meaning" Frankl
    "Atlas Shrugged" Rand
    "Clarence Darrow for the Defense" I.F. Stone
    "The Onion Field" Wambaugh
    "Helter Skelter" Bugliosi
    "North from Mexico" McWilliams
    "The Grapes of Wrath" Steinbeck
    "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" Brown
    "We Were Soldiers..." Galloway & Moore
    "Burro Genius" Villasenor"
    "Outliers" Gladwell
    "Incognito" Eagleman
    • Nov 21 2011: amazing u read all this books thats incredible
    • Nov 21 2011: Have always appreciated Trumbos' Johnny got his gun and Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is one of the few History's of America young people get to readat the grade school level. and it should awaken curious minds to question what is the "Losers" side of history since it is seldom what is told.

      Other great stoies are Endurance: Shackleton's Incredible Voyage by Alfred Lansing and Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer.
      • Nov 22 2011: In the same vein as "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" is Howard Zinn's "People's History of the United States." It begins with Columbus' initial contact with the indigenous people. I'm in the process of reading it now. It seems to be well sourced. I'm going to check out "Endurance". Thanks for the suggestion.

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