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Since oxytocin can influence trust, is it possible to use it for manipulation? Can "the moral molecule" be used for immoral purposes?

For example, is there any way in which politicians could influence the trust of their audiences, or companies influence the trust of their clients, or religious institutions influence the trust of their followers with the help of oxytocin?
Can "the moral molecule" be used for immoral purposes?

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    Nov 6 2011: Coincidentally, I just posted a comment on the Paul Zak talk earlier today with this same basic question... or rather more of a tongue in cheek recognition that if it can be done, it probably will be.

    Like some others have said already, the stimulation of our natural oxytocin seems to be par for the course in sales, grifting, advertising and graft.

    I am curious as to how much more effective externally administered oxytocin would be in comparison to a warm hug, a smile, or a solid handshake. A cute baby obviously stimulates this. Probably also a cute dog. Women seem to naturally trust the sketchiest of guys in a park if they are walking a cute dog...
    • Nov 9 2011: That's a pretty broad stroke assumption. I never met a woman who would trust a creepy guy because his dog was cute. Maybe it's a function of big city living, but sketchy is sketchy to everyone I know!
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        Nov 10 2011: I said seem to... and sketchy is in the eyes of the beholder I suppose.

        Rephrase that last bit to: women seem to talk to guys they would otherwise ignore if the guy has a cute dog or child with him. It seems to reduce the sketch factor by a large degree... Paul Zak indicated that seeing a cute baby or animal stimulates the production of Oxytocin.

        I suppose the idea is that people don't find you as sketchy if you can get their empathy hormones working.

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