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Carolyn Stancil

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How can psychology, specifically counseling psychology, be combined with teaching high school students to become innovators?

There are some elements of cognitive psychology in the process of inventing and innovating, however, how can psychology play a greater role in ultimately shaping a mind to invent the next iPod? Ultimately, how can one use psychological theory to motivate high school students to work as a team, learn additonal math and science, mechanics, as well as build and create, then be innovators?

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  • Dec 1 2011: Hi. i am a teacher, my focus is encouraging creativity, creative thinking. My students are 4 to 7 years old. I agree with all three previous responses. Creativity follows imagination which follows interest which follows personal awareness, self esteem, well-being. I organised a whole school project, thanks to funding from Creative Partnerships in England, so that all staff had the opportunity to discover/rediscover and explore what creativity meant to them, a project which lasted over a term. We worked with a local artist carefully selected for the project who could guide and question participants through this journey. A very personal challenge ensued for some individuals, because of the reasons you have explained Jacqueline, I believe. Self expression can be extremely challenging. Creative thinking underpins our approach to thinking and learning. And it it doesn't matter what the individual choses to focus on, I agree Terry. The saddest thing is a child or adult withdrawn from self-expression. We have developed questioning along side a range of thinking skills and philosophical discussion to encourage creativity and thinking with amazing results. We are sharing strategies with other schools including high schools. Encourging collaboration and investigation are key. Children are self-motivated. Have you seen the video regarding collaborative approach in india?Sugata Mitra on “Child-driven education”.
  • Dec 1 2011: I agree with Jacqueline's reply in that the more people can understand themselves, listen to their creativity/inner wisdom, the more innovative they can become. The main things that limit creativity are judgment, analysis and fear. The more people free themselves from the inner constraints, the more they are able to respond to their true purpose. And that purpose may be as an innovator, inventor or some sort of creator. That purpose can also be as a musician, painter or milkman. I feel the most important part is that we are able to give ourselves permission to live true to our inner wisdom.
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    Nov 22 2011: My background is in art and psychotherapy. I believe that psychology can be combined with teaching innovation through affirmation. Positive reinforcement that it is not important whether a student is right or wrong but it is impotrant that they trust and believe in their own ability to try something new or at least new for them. The combination of freedom and self awarness in their own learning is crucial for true innovation. In simple terms a better sense of self can help a person to bring forward their own ideas. A lesser or negative sense of self leaves a person dependent on pleasing others and doing what is expected and by extension less innovative.
  • Nov 21 2011: high schooll is too mcuh late ,,,, if sm 1 like to be a innovater from his or her child hood then at that young age should do that