hiwe pius

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Of men and passion.

I often wonder if a man could be separated - in identity - from his passion? Is it possible to separate Donald Trump from the love of real estate? Nelson Mandela from freedom fighting? Sir Ken Robinson from education transformation? or You from ...?

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    Nov 11 2011: I am passionate about justice and kindness.
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      Nov 12 2011: "I am passionate about justice and kindness."
      This covers all grounds........................................................A world of applauds to you Debra!!
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        Nov 14 2011: @Zahn what are you passionate about? apart from Debra's comment...
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          Nov 14 2011: Smiles, education, compassion, culture, arts, people, friendships.......... & life.
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      Nov 15 2011: @Zahn don't you think thats a mouth full? well thanks all the same.
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        Nov 16 2011: Dear hiwe,

        Thanks. You are right.. And none of it is worth anything without justice and kindness. What are your passions about??
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        Nov 17 2011: And you said mine was a mouthful !!!! ;-) ;-)

        So this means your passion is being an owner or manager of a business enterprise who makes money through risk and initiative of ideas in Africa ??
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          Nov 17 2011: you would have asked what i mean and not assume...well you are not thinking laterally or in a way divergent way...
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    Nov 2 2011: What we do defines us.
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      Nov 3 2011: Thanks for the comment Matt. but do you mean that the actions (passion) and the actors (people) are seperate enities entirely.
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        Nov 3 2011: On the contrary, they are one and the same. We cannot be defined without our actions.
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          Nov 3 2011: but we could be defined by our inactions, dont you think?
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        Nov 3 2011: Well when I say "What we do defines us." doesn't the mean that what's left also defines us?
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          Nov 11 2011: please try and read up my conversation with Benjamin...we would appreciate an extra insight. thanks
  • Nov 16 2011: Wow hiwe .... I think that's an interesting philosophical proposition. Even if one were to be seperated from the ability to practice one's passion,I imagine the idea would hold sway in the head and heart of the individual. Once you have experienced the "at one ness"/"Bliss" that it brings it is unlikely that one would ever renounce it..... more likely you would yearn for it, or have a stoic faith that one day you would be reunited with your passion. I'm thinking here of Viktor Frankl and his staggering book "Man's Search For Meaning". He endured the Nazi concentration camps but never gave up hope that he would be reunited with his passion "Psychotherapy", and used his experiences to evolve his treatments and positively change peoples lives for the better. His passion gave his life purpose, and quoted (selectively) Nietzsche to that end 'he who has a why to live for, can bear with almost any how'.

    I don't believe you can seperate the individual from their passion, not without changing the person in some way.
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      Nov 14 2011: thanks for that new direction of thought.
    • Nov 16 2011: Love your post Ed...... but would appreciate a bit more detail on which "ancients" you are including/excluding.
      (I'm approaching this more from a Joseph Campbell view on Myth/belief/religion..... with a smattering of Jung)
      When you say
      "Unfortunately “passion” in most of western culture, is only attributed to Eros activities." Am I right in thinking that you mean this beyond the 3 Stages of Love? In effect it is to do with appetite, veniality and carnality. To paraphrase a well known hair commercial 'You'll have it "'cos you're worth it"? So that basic messages of self worth have been distorted into this "mantra" of acquisition?...... (By the way - I pretty much agree with you, if I've interpreted correctly .... although to my mind the "Occupy" movements are proof positive that "Agape" is making a comeback.)
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        • Nov 17 2011: Hi Ed, thanks for the reply. I must check out James Hillman. Sounds like my kinda guy.

          Totally agree with your comments on enthousiasm .... possibly even more potent IRL (In Real life- an acronym I picked up working amongst some computer games developers earlier this year).

          I'm dreadfully ignorant. Please tell me what a LOC resonance check is.

          I suppose I was just a toddler for most of the 60's .... but I do think avowedly peaceful protest is the only way we are going to be able to restore some equilibrium in these desperate times, and is probably the safest way to confront the leaderships we have allowed to take hold in our western democracies. I think more and more people are waking up to the fact that "Democracy" has been comprehensively undermined with blatant 'croneyism' and revolving door policies between Governments/banks/big business.

          So IMHO it really does help to have other 'ways of being' , other paths that lead us to a Bliss or "At One Ness"(As Uncle Joe so sweetly defined it*) and routes to a transcendental realm- even if some of it is only attainable by using what I call 'high-end' make believe, a suspension of disbelief as Hazlitt would have it, or a willingness to surrender to and immerse oneself in the 'great "what if'..... the important element here is that we all have an understanding of the archetypal forces and stories that have shaped us.
          Many civilisations have known this and used it within their spiritual rituals/practices, but for me the most potent was probably the Ancient Greece of Aeschylus and Sophocles who centuries before 'Jesus"- championed 'forgiveness' over the revenge traditions. The festival of Dionysus had a much more profound purpose than the debauchery that is normally associated with it, namely to celebrate fecundity and rebirth and renewal.The drama's in particular sought to promote a Catharthis- profound pity at suffering and loss, through recognition and empathy followed by a cleansing and a hope for the future.
        • Nov 17 2011: Sorry ran out of words.... and probably guilty of 'going off on one' aswell. As you can probably tell one of my passions is "drama- storytelling"..... but most important of all is the fact that it is a 'shared experience' not something done on the privacy of your ipod.

          * I am sometimes shocked at how little Joseph Campbell and his work is known here in the UK. Of course his influence is felt world wide with practioners such as George Lucas and James Cameron.
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      Nov 16 2011: am feeling the drift of your thought process on this discussion...thumbs up
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      Nov 9 2011: thanks for your comment but could you please expanciate?
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      Nov 11 2011: please try and read up my conversation with Benjamin...we would appreciate an extra insight. thanks
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    Nov 3 2011: I think it's an extremely limited and damaging attitude to take in life. There are so many other ways we have identity as human beings - our job or passion is just one part of that identity. Our relationships with others in the community and our family, our way with people, our charisma, our compassion, our thoughts, our physical bodies, our sexuality, our bearing, our language, our friendships, our hobbies and so on.

    Naturally a person's job or passion is a facet of that identity but focusing on this to the exclusion of all other areas is a fast ticket to an unbalanced and sometimes depressing life.
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      Nov 3 2011: well thanks for that deep insight...although, of all the enlisted facets of life by Lawrence, one thing that connects with our multi - facet life is our passion, of and in itself transends beyond our jobs...
      • Nov 16 2011: Absolutely, Hiwe. I think that is one of Sir Ken's fundamental assertions - and is actually what "The Element" is about (This is the book he refers to in his first speech- as "Epiphanies". Have you read it?-it is awe inspiring). If you find what makes you passionate, you will have found your "bliss"- everything else should fall into place, and it is a natural extension that you will find others who share your passion; your "Tribe". If you're really lucky, or mindful, you can make your "passion" your work and then it doesn't feel like 'work' at all. Can passions be taught? Not in a traditional sense... but they can be revealed, forgrounded, nurtured. To pick up something Benjamin said earlier about"fairness". I look forward to a time when the evolving science of. Dermatoglyphics is more widely available. If it does what it says on the tin- an analysis of a childs fingerprints will reveal what 'intelligences/propensities" they naturally possess.... this could be hugely influential in evolving new educational paradigms which would hopefully include greater opportunity for individuated learning programs.
        I found the following video explaining the basic principles very helpful;-
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCR5vkXoeSg&feature=player_embedded
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          Nov 16 2011: Richie thanks dude...please could you send me a soft copy of the book 'Epiphanies" by Ken Robbinson?
  • Nov 17 2011: Hi hiwe - sorry I wasn't clear, the book is called "The Element" (as in we thrive when we're in our Element. I think he was originally intending to call it "Epiphanies".

    I don't have a PDf version- if that's what you mean. I bought it in Hardback the day it came out (bit of a luxury that for me- but I had to access the information and the inspiration) and dip into it every few weeks since for a recharge. It's out on loan at the moment- I'm gradually trying to make people aware of Sir ken's work and the paradigm shift he proposes. I think it is easily available on sites like amazon in paperback now.
    We have since started home educating our second child - we did with our first as well but only after she had suffered too many years of unsupported Dyslexia, within the school system.

    BTW if you have seen this RSA sketch with ken Robinson.... you are in for a treat.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDZFcDGpL4U&sns=em
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      Nov 17 2011: thanks a lot...i really do appreciate that and it opened my mind to vistas, i think we need to talk more on this topic but i need to get a copy of "the Element"
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    Nov 4 2011: Passion is a part of our personality. Yet we remain who we are whether our passions are present or not. It is a circular contradiction, but in a sense, that is what makes it true.
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      Nov 9 2011: i totally understand what you mean and thanks for the comment but i also totally disagree with the thinking behind that statement...
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        Nov 9 2011: Yeah, it makes no sense logically, but intuitively, it is correct. It's hard to wrap your head around.
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          Nov 10 2011: hey Ben thanks...what are you passionate about?
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        Nov 10 2011: I'm passionate about a lot of things; education, mainly, but as an underlying fuel to that, I'm passonate about juctice, equality, and morality. As an over-arching "blanket statement" however, I can sum up my passions into one word: equilibirum.
        I think as a general rule, in education, we are doing kids an injustice. We squander the talents that they already posess, we certainly aren't fair about it, and when we try to be fair, we confuse equality with sameness. We think that to be fair every kid needs the same amout of homework, be at the same reading level, have the same teachers, and think in the same way. To a degree, these things are quite amiable, but in reality, we tend to get children to conform to a standard, in a way trying to force them to be robots.
        This brings up all sorts of ethical delemas, and on the flip side, when we try to aknowledge diversity, we begin to stereotype, and categorize students based on race, income, demographics, and whether they are "intelligent" or "not."
        I am hoping to be able to find the balance of all these things. The balance of justice and mercy, equality, and diversity, morality and the law, formal education and experience, creativity and logic, passion and peace.
        I have found, that despite what mathematicians or scientists may say, that not everything can be explained throught math or science. There is a need for something more, an intuitive, artstic sense, which can counteract math and science, and explain what they can't. We still have theroms because we can never know for certain, and yet we continue to use them because our intuition tells us to do so. We hold that 1+1=2 becuase not only does it make sense logically, but it feels right intuitively. However, I feel that society has lost sight of the intuition, and it is most readily seen and remidied through education.
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          Nov 11 2011: Firstly...thanks for that detailed insight into your heart.
          Secondly...all these you have stated that you are passionate about are just semantics or format of a concept or idea that you are passionate about.

          Thirdly...i took my time to digest every scintilla of an alphabet in your write up and i have to tell u this.

          you are passionate about: THE FUTURE, POTENTIALS AND THESE ARE SOME OF A TOTAL OR THE SUM TOTAL OF YOUR PASSION ARE CHILDREN(to be certain of what i have just commented try and post your comment and mine for a statistical check on TED)
        • Nov 16 2011: Hi Benjamin.I love your post... and your compassion.

          As regards "Intuition"- Karen Armstrong who won the TED prize(I think the year after Sir Ken) makes the point in the introduction to one of her books that the Greeks had no problem with our essentially dual nature. That we love to find out how things work, and endeavour to reduce these to a set of empirical rules - LYCOS, and then the part that you can't explain quite so easily the stories, the myths, the superstitions and intuitions that also help to orient us in the world. MYTHOS. Since the Enlightenment we have been in the thrall of Science as the only answer , married with a steadily increasing notion of the individual, and an enshrining of the idea of personal choice, liberty etc(Paradoxically taken to it's logical extreme this may be the enemy of compassion........ everybody 'living an "ilife"... increasingingly detached from the concerns of others).

          To further complicate the equation our brains have 3 layers of evolution to them. Often our 6th sense, when our "hackles" rise, bypasses our cerebral and limbic systems and uses the more 'reptilian' brain stem. "Fear" for instance, can make apparently civilized people act in most uncivilized ways. "Instinct Leads to it".
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      Nov 12 2011: Who we are is the sum of all that constitutes our being and sometimes beyond, therefore passion inevitably is part of who we are. Real passions in life are those which we would be a completely different person without.