John Medeiros

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Survival of the good steward is survival of the fittest, and this is how evolution applies to any technological animal.

Technology is in relation to religion, or ethics, and to the evolutionary process, and I propose that: "Survival of the good steward is survival of the fittest" and that this is the original and true message of scientific information intended to be conveyed to us by the New Testament Gospel, whatever the source of the Gospel may be. I invite anyone who takes human technology seriously or who takes Christian thought seriously to give genuine consideration to this viewpoint by application of the two principles and the five questions: A) The Gospel message is about scientific facts, not about morality; B) The purpose of the Gospel message is to tell us what we need to know, what we need to know in order to survive and thrive as a species. Five questions: 1) What is the kingdom of heaven? 2) What is the main theme or main idea conveyed by the parables? 3) Why are there so many parables about good servants and bad servants? 4) What do all the good servants have in common? 5) What do all the bad servants have in common? -- Using this procedure of "the two principles and the five questions" is essentially a scientific experiment. My proposition is that you will get the same result that I got: The Gospel message is scientific. It describes evolution. Survival of the good steward is survival of the fittest. The Gospel message teaches the environmental law of the universe, not a moral stance that can be adopted or disputed, not a moral option but a physical law of the universe. For further support, see video "Religion for Adults" on YouTube or book: The Primacy of Stewardship, or jmanimas dot com. Due to the lifetime of years I have devoted to this project, I am "tortured" by the reluctance of environmentalists to call upon the Gospel message as an effective religious defense of environmental science. We need to fight fundamentalist religion with rational religion, not only with science.