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The discussion of human death in school curricula, particularly Science.

In Science, the topic of recycling of nutrients (like the carbon cycle) seems to be a disguise for the the biological nature of death - one that very seldom includes humans in the picture. Is it too touchy a subject for schools? Is there a neutral, non-judgmental way of discussing biological death (including of humans) in natural curriculum links rather than in counselling when dealing with death only when it happens (which are limited to the counselor's office)?

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    Oct 16 2011: Actually I did include death in my science curriculum and let the students express their views. We found that everyone had good ideas of their own and we were tolerant of those ideas. I tried to tie it to the fact that we are basically energy at our core of existence and that energy is neither lost nor created but it does change form. I gave no definitive answers but let the students talk about it and think it through for themselves.
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      Oct 16 2011: James, that's exactly what I did, too. I'm curious, though. Is there a formal state/national standard where this is found? Or is it a persona/class interest that motivated this topic? Because it is formally absent from the DP Biology curriculum which I teach.
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        Oct 16 2011: I am unaware of any state or national standard in the U.S. that covers this subject in any class. I teach about 60 different subjects due to being and independent studies teacher from 6th to 12th grades in a larger district. I have yet to see it as a standard at either the California level or the U.S. Standards level but they are always in flux so who knows? I have no information on international standards but I would be interested in seeing the standards you are required to teach if they are available on line and in English as I assume you are not a US teacher? Please forgive me if my assumption is incorrect.
        James Turner

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