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Nikko Scelzo

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Is everyone capable of deep intellectual thought?

I have been thinking a lot lately and I have wondered whether or not the average person is capable of the intellectual thoughts of the "geniuses" of our world. Is it possible that the geniuses of our world have just been fortunate enough to connect the dots and that everyone is capable of these thoughts, they just have not had that sort of... self discovery yet.

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  • Oct 10 2011: I am 14 and spend many hours on TED a week.

    I believe that I am capable of intellectual thought, despite my age. I am fascinated by (almost) every video I watch, and believe that I comprehend, and analyze many of the theories, ideas, propositions, narratives, ect. much like many of the more mature TED frequenters.

    When I show a video to one of my friends that I found very interesting, they usually do not seem to tap into the subject matter as intently as I did initially.

    I do not believe that this is a result of my brain working any differently, seeing as I am not an exemplary student, nor do I test higher, have the ability to retain more knowledge, or function any differently then your average teenager. Although I do find it slightly curious that it is very hard for some of my friends to comprehend concepts that I find fairly basic.

    I admit that this may be a result of them just not having an opinion about the topic at hand, or weather they do not care enough to devout any thought to the subject what so ever.

    I also do not know if this issue is a result of my age, and by no means do I consider myself more mature then other people my age. I just seem to be more interested and engaged in many of the deeper topics discussed nowadays.

    Because of this observation, I drew to the conclusion that either some people (my age specifically) have a greater ability to comprehend, analyze, and develop an opinion, then others. Or that some people are just more willing to devote time and effort into understanding the subject at hand, only if they care about the subject at hand.
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      Oct 12 2011: Connor,

      I appreciate your very thoughtful comment. I had a similer experience as a teenager, because I have always been interested in human behavior (mine included), and I enjoyed delving into philosophy, psychology, ancient practices and beliefs, etc.

      I also was never an "exemplary student" in the class room. In fact, I was often "escaping" the class room setting, in favor of other ways to learn:>) I've always been puzzled by the fact that people often do not want to explore, what to me, are very basic concepts.

      I think/feel that you are wise, to understand that sometimes people don't have an opinion about a topic, they may not care enough to spend time on the subject, they may be afraid to delve deeply because sometimes we don't like what we discover on a deeper level, and some people may have a greater ability to comprehend, analyze, and develop an opinion. For me, it all comes down to curiosity and fascination with being human. I am very interested in this life form, I believe I am on the earth to explore, and I enjoy the process:>)

      You seem to be a very insightful young person, and I'm glad to see you joining in the TED conversations:>)

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