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Andrew Shough

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In what year do you think we'll be able to abolish the working class, if ever?

Given the continual decrease of world poverty rates and the impending automation of production and resource acquisition, how long do you think it will take for human civilization to establish a system dedicated towards ambition, knowledge and advancement of ourselves and society as a whole? Any answers pertaining to the feasibility of this occurrence and what it may entail would be appreciated.

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    Sep 29 2011: Hi Andrew, what an interesting question.
    From my perspective, I would rather see working class redefined than abolished. I think everyone should be a contributing member of society and that we naturally want to make a contribution through our work. We need to redefine what work is just like they did when sports teams became a money making opportunity. What if we structured our societies so that all work had meaning, value and prestige? What if the person who cleaned the building or those who delivered food were seen with more respect and as a nurturing force for good. What if the people who cleaned the streets were valued as restoration artists? What if everyone at every level of intelligence and ability simply did what they really were best at, art, finance, infection prevention, making tools, etc. and they did it for a fair share of the resources of a country? I think it would be a far better world with everyone giving the best part of themselves
  • Sep 30 2011: I meant to imply that the working class would be obsolete only for those who do not wish to have working class jobs. All individuals in this civilization would be able to pursue their respective passions as they wished, which would include working class jobs.

    Currently, working class jobs indicate occupations with a high degree of repetition or specialization with little dynamic cognition. Things like working at fast food places, construction, laborer, assembly line worker, etc could be examples of working class jobs that are often undesirable by those who participate in them, but not necessarily abolished if people still desire to do them in accordance to their passions.
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    Sep 29 2011: I'm sorry, but, why do we WANT to abolish the working class?

    At first I thought you meant to abolish the idea of living hand-to-mouth, but then you threw in "a system dedicated towards ambition, knowledge and advancement of ourselves and society as a whole" - which implies that you believe that someone working in a factory is ambition-less.

    I submit that even if we had Star Trek-like replicators and everyone could have exactly what they wanted by speaking a command, you'd still find people hand-making things - and their value would increase rather than decline. I'm pretty sure we are in a peculiar bubble where we undervalue craftsmanship in favour of consumerism and disposable crap - something that is actually costing the planet dearly.

    EDIT: fixed typos. Stupid tablet. Stupid fingernails.
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    Sep 29 2011: how do you define working class? newscaster is working class? actor? pro-gamer? pro-game shoutcaster? relationship coach? marketing manager? office manager? professional writer?

    if you mean anyone who gets a wage, then probably not anytime soon. but maybe one day.

    if you mean people working at an assembly line, definitely, machines will take this one over.
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    Sep 29 2011: I think it is impossible to abolish working class. you may ( again I am not sure) abolish blue collars but still you'll need white collars to press the buttons and then they will be the new majority of the working class.