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Brandt DeLany

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How to revolutionize tipping and improve service at restaurants.

Instead of tipping at the end of a meal why not post the estimated tip at the beginning and then just add or remove dollar bills (or chips which could be imprinted with the company logo) from the table as you get good or bad service. Waiters know how well they are doing, you get better quality service, and restaurants improve service levels and staffing while delivering truly outstanding service which gets rewarded in real time.

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    May 23 2011: Chips.......Take away and add to, sounds like a silly game. If I don't like the food I tell the wait staff. When I get good service I tip well when the service is lousy I leave a bright new copper cent. 'Nuff said. The restaurants I visit have a manager who visits with each customer to see if everything is well.
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    May 20 2011: I KIND OF love this idea. However (and speaking as a former restaurant owner) the waiter is expected to give perfect service each and every time, to each and every customer, regardless of what the tip might be. Does this always happen? No. But, it IS what the waiter is expected to TRY to achieve. Your system would allow for a waiter to do poor work if the posted tip was too low. That's not how restaurants work.
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      May 20 2011: Poor workers are quickly displaced in the service industry. This would allow mangers to quickly see how people are doing and give guidance and training or eliminate a poor resource.
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    May 19 2011: The thing we need to remember in these cases is to differentiate between bad serving and a bad dining experience; often the service is fine but the food is lacking, either in presentation, availability and timing...We need to remember that the sever is often at the mercy of the kitchen...
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      May 19 2011: Very true.
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      May 20 2011: Ok granted not for every restaurant but if it were mine I would want to know if it was the food or the service because it normally takes both to succeed.
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    May 17 2011: You have a very good point here. I don't know how much waiter/waitress get paid in America, They get good incentive though. But also the tipping is good way to get good service. I experience always, when i go to the restaurant the waiter over there always remember my face and always come upfront to serve me. The reason is i tip them always good. So your idea is good one to get good service if you tip them good.
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      May 17 2011: Naeem - thanks for your comment. Maybe you can tell us about tipping in your culture? I have no idea either of how to tip overseas. In the US a fine restaurant is 20% for excellent dine in service. Mid price restaurant 15% is average.
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    May 17 2011: A really novel and workable idea! Have you been studying Psychology?
    It would demand accountability from the payer though. How many people leave their tip and grumble and run away. I think the danger would be in retaliation from the waiter who would resent having his work so clearly judged. (Its really hard to detect when someone has spit in your food!)
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      May 17 2011: Thank you for the compliment Debra. I am not a Psych major but I am currently looking at going back to grad school in Social Work which is very related. I do think I see life through a different lens sometimes and your post is great fuel for me to realize that people do want to hear what I have to say. Be sure to add me on Facebook.
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        May 17 2011: Thank you Brandt for the invitation but I am not a Facebooker. I do wish you well in your future studies and career.
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    May 17 2011: Then waiters would have little incentive to up-sell.
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      May 17 2011: Less than 5 minutes ago: How is that so. If I buy $25 worth of food the tip is $5 if I buy $50 worth of food the tip is $10. That's not incentive to upsell?

      Sorry but my queer math says that:
      More service = buy more food = bigger tips = better service