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Joshua  Beers

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If I had 100% of your genes and 100% of your environmental experience I would be you.

I think that this statement is completely accurate. Do you agree?
Yes? No? Why? Why Not?

The repercussions seem obvious. It's the classic question: Do we really have free will?

In my personal opinion, however alluring "free will" is as a subject of belief, it doesn't exist in any form. Every decision we make, from important to mundane, can be either attributed to genes or environment. What other factor is there? A soul? Did we get to choose that? From my standpoint, I don't see how this CANNOT rule out arguments free will.

As a side note, compatibilists may argue that "choice" IS making decisions based on the given "will" but I would ask them to elaborate. Is that really freedom at all? "Of course we have free will, we have no choice in the matter."

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    May 12 2011: So what of free will? I hold the position that free will does exist. Especially in circumstances of future change. When I look at situations that are occurring and take action to sway the outcome that is free will in action.
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      May 13 2011: Thomas, with all due respect, I feel like you have yet to make the full case for truly random events let alone translating those repercussions into full blown free will. (I apologize for what what may be my inability to "connect the dots.")

      "When I look at situations that are occurring and take action to sway the outcome that is free will in action."

      Where do you think the decision to do that came from?
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        May 13 2011: Regardless of where the decision comes from the ability to choose the direction in which you go is free will.
        • May 13 2011: Thomas,

          I think that simply states (which is usually very hard to do) exactly what I was trying to get across. Thank you.
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          May 14 2011: @Thomas

          That seems to me, to be the very definition of compatiblism. Whose sole, major criticism is that while correct in fundamental rationale, it is incorrect in labelling its result "free will."

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