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Quality of Life, or the lack of it, depends on what we perceive as valuable.

Because quality of life is rare, we have to ask what value is. Because it seems that most of what's considered valuable is useless and much of what's considered useless is very valuable.

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    May 4 2014: "When you are discontent, you always want more, more, more. Your desire can never be satisfied. But when you practice contentment, you can say to yourself, 'Oh yes - I already have everything that I really need." Dalai Lama
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      May 4 2014: Good point Rodrigo and Dalai Lama:>)
      If we are not content with what we have, what makes one think that s/he might be content with more?

      That idea suggests looking outward, for something that can be recognized and practiced from within:>)
      • May 7 2014: Hi Coleen and Rodrigo
        Good point for bolth you!
        The bad Marcketing insists on creating false needs greatly contributing to people to remain in a kind of perennial dissatisfaction and thus seek to cap their "holes" consuming, consuming, consuming ... this way works against good quality of life ...
        Have a nice day!
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          May 28 2014: Hello Psic,
          My perception and experience, is that people have choices, and are not obligated to "remain in a kind of perennial dissatisfaction".

          If one wants to change his/her quality of life, s/he simply makes different choices.
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        May 7 2014: For me, there is a very crucial and subtle distinction between "being content" and "being content with what we have", at least as I perceive the phrases. And I thank you Colleen for stimulating me to write about this (and hope you are well!)

        If I am content with what I have, then I will lose the drive to invent, perfect, go beyond, and explore, an even take risks. I personally never want to feel that way.

        What I do want to feel is "content", which in my vocabulary I think I call "joy" - a permanent state of my being and outlook towards life, regardless of my circumstances.

        Or maybe I am not mapping our words as you mean them.
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          May 28 2014: Hi Danger! I am well, and hope the same for you my friend:>)

          I am content with what I have at any given time, and I KNOW there is more to achieve, explore and experience. I find that the risk taking part decreases as I age, and that feels ok because I am content with whatever is happening in the moment, and I know there is another moment and experience to explore:>)

          Joy feels to me a little like happiness....fleeting at times. I can always be content without joy and happiness.....I can be content even when facing sadness and sometimes uncomfortable challenges. Contentment for me, is part of the foundation which I build on in any given moment:>)

          We all "map" words differently, with different meanings to us as individuals, and accepting that fact contributes to my contentment, joy, happiness, and quality of life:>)
    • May 5 2014: I think quality of life is rare because most people live in misery, both material and spiritual.But first we need to define Quality of Life and then see if it's available widely.So, what''s Quality of Life? Because we cannot recognize anything for what it is if we do not know its characteristics.
    • May 5 2014: I think quality of life is rare because most people live in misery, both material and spiritual.But first we need to define Quality of Life and then see if it's available widely.So, what''s Quality of Life? Because we cannot recognize anything for what it is if we do not know its characteristics.
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        May 5 2014: "Quality of life (QOL) is the general well-being of individuals and societies. QOL has a wide range of contexts, including the fields of international development, healthcare, and politics. Quality of life should not be confused with the concept of standard of living, which is based primarily on income. Instead, standard indicators of the quality of life include not only wealth and employment but also the built environment, physical and mental health, education, recreation and leisure time, and social belonging.

        According to ecological economist Robert Costanza:

        While Quality of Life (QOL) has long been an explicit or implicit policy goal, adequate definition and measurement have been elusive... Also frequently related are concepts such as freedom, human rights, and happiness. However, since happiness is subjective and difficult to measure, other measures are generally given priority. It has also been shown that happiness, as much as it can be measured, does not necessarily increase correspondingly with the comfort that results from increasing income. As a result, standard of living should not be taken to be a measure of happiness..."

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quality_of_life
    • May 7 2014: Hi Coleen and Rodrigo
      Good point for bolth you!
      The bad Marcketing insists on creating false needs greatly contributing to people to remain in a kind of perennial dissatisfaction and thus seek to cap their "holes" consuming, consuming, consuming ... this way works against good quality of life ...
      Have a nice day!
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        May 20 2014: I agree! I recently learned about Edward Bernays (fascinating guy to research) and was saddened but not too surprised to learn that from the beginning, the purpose of advertising (and public relations) is to unconsciously manipulate people into buying and doing things they don't need or even want in order to support this pyramid scheme of an economy we've got going here with the 1% at the top. I had kinda thought this darker part of advertising was relatively new.
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          May 26 2014: ... "manipulate people into buying and doing things they don't need or even want in order to support this pyramid scheme of an economy we've got going here with the 1% at the top." Danger Lampost

          DL, your statement above, "PYRAMID SCHEME OF AN ECONOMY", is the simplest and clearest explanation why there are the top 1% and bottom 99%.

          One of the most critical keys to living a life of joy and contentment is avoiding the trap many of us fall into: “We buy things we don't need with money we don't have to impress people we don't like.” Dave Ramsey, The Total Money Makeover: A Proven Plan for Financial Fitness
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      May 20 2014: Dali Lama Says: 'Oh yes - I already have everything that I really need."

      I would add: "Yes, I have everything I need to find joy, only I keep getting in my own way." This 'everything' that I have is in reality my own life that I live to find my own personal meaning. There are no things that I 'have' that are apart from me. It is me that I need to be happy. I am all I really need.

      A shadow side of spirituality (as Greg Dahlen perhaps suggests) might interpret Dali Lama's quote to mean that I should be happy with "everything that I have" or perhaps (to put it negatively) "despite everything I don't have", thus using spirituality as a tool to numb myself to some suffering in my life in order to feel happy. And ignoring suffering just leads to... more suffering.

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