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Should the grades earned from institutions matter when applying a job?

As most of us know that some companies, organizations and institutions pay much attention to grades of candidates, applicants or students while others think that grades do not determine how applicants are worthy to employ, but their character and other aspects do.
So most of the time students try to earn as high grades as possible ans study for grades.

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    Apr 11 2014: Grades have long been deemed a measure of one's level of understanding and competency in specific areas of knowledge. The only other measure I know of is observation of an individual within that area of knowledge.

    But my experience in post--secondary education was that grades were ALL that mattered to the vast majority of students, while breadth and depth of understanding of any particular subject was often over-looked or even discounted by many. Most students carry workloads and have cost of living concerns that leave little to no time to actually absorb or develop real comprehension of any of the subject material.

    The testing process of students invariably only measure that person's ability to cram for exams, retain enough data to pass the exam, regurgitate that data during the exam and then forget it all in order to cram for the next exam ad nauseam.

    Then there is the problem of cheating, buying papers and gaming the system because it is the piece of paper at the end of the process that actually counts, not the effort or understanding related to the subject.
    • Apr 12 2014: "The testing process of students invariably only measure that person's ability to cram for exams, retain enough data to pass the exam, regurgitate that data during the exam and then forget it all in order to cram for the next exam ad nauseam. "

      You comment and your above statement has spoken the truth.
  • Gail G3

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    Apr 12 2014: That depends on the career. I never focused on high grades. I found (when I was in the position of hiring people) that I found a "C" average far more effective in inter-personal skills. Those with solid "A" were often incapable of putting the book learning to use. This is NOT a hard and fast rule. But, depending on what I was hiring someone for, grades were far less important than anyone ever told me that they would be. Smart, intellectually curious, and more creative are more important to me than grades.

    If you want a career in education, then grades are obviously important and social skills not so much.
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    Apr 30 2014: My experience may not be as relative as it is from the late 70's, however, at that time a few major firms who were recruiting at Cal Poly indicated that while grade point average did indeed count, they were just as concerned with the overall person, in terms of past experiences, extra curricular activities, etc. Recently my nephew, 13, was lucky enough to become involved in the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO) and they stressed that he drop virtually all of his outside interests, including sports. The rationale is that, in their opinion, colleges and universities are now looking for specialization or a limited scope of interest but with high achievement. It would be interesting to hear from those firms, HP, Motorola (now Google owned), etc., to see if this is truly the case.
  • Apr 23 2014: it depends on the kind of job. for example, if you are applying for a job that requires for a great deal of academic knowledge, it's probably a need to have good grades. then again, if you a apply for a job that doesn't require that much of academic knowledge, then your GPA shouldn't really matter. however, that also brings up the debate about your ability to concentrate in school and in your career life.
  • Apr 14 2014: While I do understand that we need some form of measuring ones understanding of a subject, I think that an alternative might be something to consider. Very often grades can be brought down by subjects that are manditory but irrelivent to the actual major.
    Also, a person may very well understand something, but be a horrible test taker.
    It is not that we shouldn't have a way to determine what a student knows, but the current method seems less than accurate.
  • Apr 13 2014: Unfortunately, grades and which institutions you graduated from counts for many companies. I know of several law firms that hire only from Harvard and Yale and they love the editor of the law review. I have hired people with C+ average because of their senior project or what they did in a coop job. In both cases, I had to fight HR. HR always want to follow the rules with no exceptions, i.e. grades, institution, right tech words in their resume, etc.