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Do you believe that humanitarian work on a local, national, or international level could be a good therapy for treating people with autism?

Do you believe that humanitarian work on a local, national, or international level could be a good therapy for treating people with autism in terms of developing social skills? I went on a life-changing trip to Guatemala improving a local school there even though I grew up with autism in my life. My parents introduced me to humanitarian work in Mexico giving food and clothes to local families for Christmas. I was inspired to do humanitarian work because of the examples of many of my best friends and family from Kaysville, Utah, USA and I wanted to follow in their footsteps. Since then, I've implemented "charity tourism" by donating children's books to a local charity, Helen's Hope Chest, in Mesa, Arizona, USA in the summer of 2013 and I'm currently working on helping Brigham Young University start an autism research program on its campus, which really shows how much confidence I have gained in speaking with other people. In every one of the humanitarian situations I've been in, I had to learn teamwork with people and develop problem-solving skills especially in planning what good causes I wanted to participate in, both of which require social skills naturally. I personally believe that humanitarian work is a good and simple way for people with autism to break out of their comfort zones and expand their horizons by giving them a social opportunity to interact with people.

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  • Apr 8 2014: Remember, Humanitarian work can refer to any local or small charity like Habitat for Humanity, Best Buddies, Special Olympics, or Make a Wish Foundation. It can also refer to the construction of orphanages and schools around the world in special humanitarian groups.