TED Conversations

david george

junior engineer, KABSONS

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ROADS HAVING SMALL HOLES (to save rain water and increasing under ground water)

this is david ..i m proposing one idea to increase under ground water ... yes we are all know if rain was coming on to the earth there is a scope to sink in to the earth in cities.but out side of the city rain water sinks in to the earth ..why because outside cities having no construction with building and roads . that's why in between cities rain water cannot sink in to the earth .. what i am saying if roads are made up with small holes .these holes are very small and minute holes and closed ones ..when ever rain comes due to the moisture these holes will open ..these construction made up above the surface at least 2 to 3 cm ..when rain comes water sinks through these holes ..so that water sinks in to the earth ..like this we have another advantage is their ..ready made road blocks are easy to carry and time saving ..no use of labour to work more days ...if any damage occures no need to digging the raod we can place the new blocks easily by removing the damaged part...............

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    Mar 5 2014: Hi David,
    Here are a couple ideas being used in the area where I live (northeast USA). We are seeing more projects coming into the regional project review committee with these ideas and materials to address the storm water challenge.

    There are permeable materials now being used for roads, driveways, parking lots, sidewalks etc. Many projects have rain gardens in the design, and as Darrell mentions...retention ponds/retention basins.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permeable_paving

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rain_garden

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retention_basin
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      Mar 6 2014: i thought too colleen steen . lot of problem we will face if we dont conserve ground water ..
  • Mar 5 2014: This would be very expensive because cars, people, and other things... walk along roads. You would a nice filtration system to get everything out of the water. Also drilling holes into the ground and running pipes through all of them would take a very long time.
    Your idea is great but it is complicated and would require a lot of work and money to complete.
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    Mar 5 2014: Good idea, David-

    But probably very hard to build a workable model that does not require incredible amounts of maintenance and repair. Drilling holes or using some sort of massive perforating machine with spikes could be done, theoretically. But how are the holes going to be kept open and free of pebbles and debris? What happens when ice forms in holes and under the road surface- ice will cause all sorts of buckling.

    What you need to do, David, is make several scale models of your notion and monitor their performance over time in all weathers. Ask the Germans- they build the best roads, by far. Our US highway system is a poorly designed and constructed joke compared to the Autobahn.
  • Mar 4 2014: I live in the desert city of Phoenix Arizona. Here we get few rainy days, but when we do get them, it is usually short bursts of heavy rain. To maximize water absorption and minimize runoff, most new construction areas are required to landscape in water catchments into the project.

    These are low areas where the water can drain off the roads into, but where the water is held until it can sink in. They usually have overflows that prevent too much water from building up and flooding streets or houses.

    So, in effect, instead of having a single cement trench designed to get rid of water as quickly as possible, what we have is a series of terraced pools designed to store the water so that it can sink in.
  • Mar 3 2014: While not an issue everywhere, in places with freezing temperatures, it is important to keep water out of roads because volume increase with freezing causes the water to destroy the roads.

    Even without freezing, wet ground under a road can cause liquefaction, allowing the road to settle unevenly creating dips, bumps, cracks and in general, a rough ride.

    Originally, roads were created with a layer of stones or brick laid over a level of sand. Water (and other stuff, this was the days of chamber pots and horse drawn vehicles) coals soak into the roads. But, the roads had to be in a constant state of repair to re-level them.

    Sure, our concrete and asphalt roads need maintenance, but it is a tiny, tiny fraction of what the preceding stone or brick roads needed.
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      Mar 4 2014: yes i agree with u ...my intention is to improve underground water ..why because for agriculture purpose and irrigation purpose it is require save the rain water .....u said about dips ,bumps , i thought too face this problem ..but this is re searchable matter ,,if we want to catch the water when rainy seasons ,,we require huge catchment place like reservoirs ,,i thought many cities facing scarcity of the lands that's why it is difficult ..so better to inject the water into the ground only ..