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Can the reaction of certain unhealthy foods trigger bad chemical reaction sin the brain and in some release a 'bipolar' chemical reaction?

This might seem so far fetched, but just thought I should ask as I am doing my biology homework. I wanted to know if it is possible that certain chemicals that are put in foods can possibly effect our brain in different ways, especially for people in lower income communities where it's not always the best choice of food, but cheap and might eat more of the food that is not good for them and among other reasons bipolar can occur can affect many of the minorities? I guess just trying to ask - over a period of time can certain foods cause negative chemical reactions in the brain and are those chemical reactions excluding mental illness chemical reactions if mixed with the wrong bit in the brain? Also wanted to know if the U.S is taking into consideration all the shootings and investing in researching the cause of mental health.

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    Feb 27 2014: Here is forum thread with many writing about their experiences with gluten and mental issues: http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/79882-gluten-intolerance-and-bipolar-ii/
    After I stopped eating gluten, my mood leveled out. Mental fog dissipated. No longer felt toxic and lethargic as if on opioids.

    Consistency is relevant here. If brain is fed similar foods at similar times of day, then it knows how to process the nutrients. If brain is fed variety of foods at differing times of day, then maybe brain gets confused.
  • Feb 13 2014: The condition it self is there or not and to different degrees. Foods definitely could enhance bi polar disorders. Even commonly used foods with caffeine can exaggerate symptoms in the hyperpolar. Alcohol with meals can effect hypomania. Actually if you want to go into this the very water you drink anywhere is full of different variations of lithium which is the primary stabilizer used in bi polar conditions. Yet you also have to realize different people react differently to identical substances in foods. There are many variables here and I don't think you will find a definate answer to your question.
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    Feb 27 2014: i don't know about combinations. I tend to think solid food in general is not as good for you as my diet. For the last five years I have been living entirely on fluid milk products, mostly skim milk and a little cream. Most days I drink about two gallons of skim milk. I believe it is easier on your body to digest and use milk. I am trying to get the diet approved officially as a healthy diet by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and I would also like to have the diet scientifically tested to see if it might help with different diseases, like cancer and AIDS. I just made a video about this topic: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpAggB9CHtg
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    Feb 5 2014: Your question about the relationship between diet and bipolar disorder is difficult to research online because there are a lot of unsupported diet and health claims you may find on the web on sites that might look authoritative to you but aren't. Your teacher will verify this.

    This is an active area of research, I have discovered, but results are thus far not conclusive.