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    Feb 3 2014: I think communiting is, like Dennis says, the biggest problem. I think we need to get our infrastructure to a level where we can pretty much remove petrol-fueled cars from cities so everyone can use public transport, ensuring that this is also affordbale. So separate bus lanes, wider pavements and pedestrianised squares so more people are more inclined to walk & separate bike lanes.

    The other side of the coin is not just reducing traffic and improving public transport but also making our cities greener. So more grassy verges, more parks, tree-lined drives & moss-covered roof tops. Greener environments act both as a place to destress and connect with nature but also as a counter to the urban heat-island effect. Not to mention it acts as a buffer against flooding.
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      Feb 3 2014: From a European perspective, commuting is a major problem for big cities. Many policies are tested from implementing toll area in city centers (London, GBR; Stockholm, SWE), use of charged surrounding car parks with access to the public transports included in the fare (Bordeaux, FRA), public car sharing (Paris, FRA)…

      Development of public transports is a major issue. When it is possible to plan new cities or extensions, public transports should be set in the top list (see comment from Vera Nova below). When you need to redesign the network in old cities, it is more difficult. But can be achieve: see what has been done in Curitiba, BRA ( http://www.urbanhabitat.org/files/25.Curitiba.pdf ) where 70% of its commuters are taking the bus. Facing demographic explosion, the city is now developing bicycle: 300 kilometers of tracks are under construction.

      But outside big cities or for long travel distance, public transports can be less efficient. I am very surprised by the development of Car Pooling in Europe. Millions of people are meeting every working day to share their personal car to go to work. 20 years ago people were considering their car as a private (and closed) space only for them. Now they are ready to share it to optimize their travel cost and travel time. It can divide by 2 or 3 the number of commuting cars.

      It seems that if we want to sustain mobility in an efficient and agile way, we will need a combination of policies including regulations like toll areas, education, usage of new technologies like ITS (connected cars, mobility safe apps…), Internet to work from home when possible, fuel efficient cars,…

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