TED Conversations

Luis Almeida

Associate Professor of Communications Media, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

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The idea that we can emulate the machine, without experiencing side effects, is dangerous.

The human brain wasn’t made to process large amounts of information continuously without rest. Our brains have limited capacities, will get tired, and break down overtime if we continue to abuse them. It isn’t rocket science or science fiction, it is plain common sense. The idea that we can emulate the machine, without experiencing side effects, is dangerous.

In reality, societies are already emulating the pace of living of the machine and setting societal norms based on computer behavior. We are using smartphones and iPads at the dinner table, tweeting about an emergency first before calling for help, and working not from 9-to-5 but from 9-to-forever.

We are constantly being bombarded by email alerts, facebook notifications, tweets, texts, etc and working during vacations and almost always well into the night. And we let that happen to us.

It is only after a total technology burn out from mental exhaustion and fatigue that folks will stop their computer-like neurotic behaviors.

The TEDx talk titled, "Breaking Free From technology" can be of value to this discussion.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3u2VasrA4M

This Hongkiat blog entry can also illuminate the idea.
http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/reboot-humanity/

:)

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    Feb 19 2014: We're definitely in the thrall of these ever-advancing technologies, and increasingly harassed by them. Ironically, the design and function of these devices often mimic features of our own physiology [the machine can emulate us], and although this may explain our apparent affinity with them, they can consume our energies and divert our attention to a point which seriously undermines our mental and physical well-being.

    The machinations of sophisticated microprocessor chips may eventually exhaust our most highly developed cerebral cortices, but what of the heart, the soul, the imagination of such a device; and where does it go for lunch?

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