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Austin Jones

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Elementary education reform.

I have a mapped out curriculum that entails practices of bio/neurofeedback into elementary schools. Basically just emotional therapy, cognitive exercises, abstract thought building, and individual analysis. All of this without changing the system too much, that's my goal for an easy and agreeable transition. The goal being that we want to captivate a childs' imagination, identify what their individual interests are, build on that while still educating them on the other fronts, and teach them about their own mind. How their mentality is effected by environment and how to control it. Show people at a young age how to identify when their emotions have relatively larger impacts on their decision making processes.

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    Jan 26 2014: I can understand almost everything you're saying. I just have yet to see any type of education that teaches young children to control their emotions, or makes a big focus on that. Other than telling them being mean is bad and sharing is good. I've yet to see something like this, my son was born just a week ago so maybe in the next 10 years I'll have a better idea for how to do this.
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      Jan 26 2014: Congratulations, Austin! When you start looking for materials to support your parenting, you will find them. One useful place to start might be Michael Gurian's The Wonder of Boys, which is aimed at parents and at educators. An even better known book of this kind aimed at addressing emotional challenges for girls is Raising Ophelia.

      The training teachers receive on addressing the social and emotional needs of their students is closely connected to the students' age. So the teachers who work on these issues with grade school students use different material and lesson arrangements than those who work with, say, adolescents.

      Again, what a beautiful time for you!

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