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What would become of the world if mosquitoes were to go into extinction?

Mosquitoes are hunted badly everywhere in the world and most malaria control programs are aimed at eliminating the vectors- mosquitoes.
but, just like other arthropods, don't they have other 'useful' impacts on the environment where they exist?

  • Jan 20 2014: Well for one thing the "OFF" corporation would loose a lot of money and populations would increase at a significant rate making the world more crowded and crazy. If they did nothing but kill people by spreading disease, they have served a useful purpose for maintaining the planet. I hate to break it to the human race but we are not the only species on this planet and our job is not to kill all the other species.
  • Jan 18 2014: I have no idea what would happen if mosquitos were eliminated. However, it is well known that no matter the organism its sudden extinction will change the environment for other organisms which rely on the presence of the mosquito. In addition, it is also well known that human influence when attempting to make changes advantageous to people have most often resulted in terrible disasters, e.g. the introduction of rabbits to Australia for hunting purposes, the introduction of the cane toad to Australia to get rid of the cane beetle. In both cases this ended in disaster, cane toads now exist in their millions in northern Australia being a terrible pest since no local predators can eat them without dying. Rabbits were only controlled by the use of mixamatosis which attacks only rabbits.,
  • Jan 17 2014: Assuming you manage to get them all (for which current efforts are inadequate), that depends on whether you're exterminating the mosquitoes indiscriminately and completely, or you're specifically targeting the "problem" ones.

    Assuming the second option, the impact may prove minimal.
    Assuming the first, we're looking at disruption to ecosystems, and perhaps certain agricultural products the mosquitoes pollinate. Just how bad is hard to say, but its still not exactly an apocalyptic scenario. Bees have disappeared from much of the world, and while its caused no small share of problems, civilization has hardly collapsed for it.
  • Jan 24 2014: thank you for your reply Mr. Greg.
    so, Mr. Greg, what you are trying to insinuate, if am right, is that the mosquitoes are just like the Masais and 'we, humans' the cow. But, my question is, what would happen to the world's ecological systems where these organisms occupy and do you think that killing them until they become extinct is an effective means of malaria eradication given the fact that most diseases are re-emerging nowadays?
    thank you once more.
  • Jan 24 2014: thank you for your reply Mr. Greg.
    so, Mr. Greg, what you are trying to insinuate, if am right, is that the mosquitoes are just like the Masais and 'we, humans' the cow. But, my question is, what would happen to the world's ecological systems where these organisms occupy and do you think that killing them until they become extinct is an effective means of malaria eradication given the fact that most diseases are re-emerging nowadays?
    thank you once more.
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    Jan 22 2014: Duru, you're probably aware of the Masai tribe of Kenya? From what I've read, they do a thing where they shoot a small arrow into one of their cow's veins. Then when blood starts to come out of the wound, they catch the blood in a cup. They pull the arrow out, put some mud on the cow's wound, and the cow goes on with their life. But the Masai drink the blood from the cup, or mix it with milk and drink the two together. Somehow this idea, of drinking the blood without killing the cow, makes me think of mosquitoes?
    • Jan 24 2014: The metaphor breaks down once you consider that the Masai also guard, care for, and feed their cows (or at least allow them to graze safely).

      Granted, mosquitoes are also responsible for a certain amount of pollination, but the harm the biting species do spreading disease is far greater then their benefit.
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        Jan 24 2014: well, I didn't say the Masai were the human version of a mosquito, Nadav, I just said they perhaps took this one idea from the mosquito? Do you like the idea of drinking your cow's blood without killing your cow? Some people in Israel follow a kosher where they rid the surface blood? But I don't see the point, because even if you take the surface blood you still killed the animal so you could eat it, taking the surface blood doesn't change that fact.
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    Jan 22 2014: I think it's quite good. I don't mind. Just like always living in winter and spring without those unpleasant insects.
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    Jan 22 2014: There are 3,500 named species of mosquito, of which only a couple of hundred bite or bother humans. So say we eradicate these 200 species - Would it have any knock on effects further down the ecosystem's food chain? Wiping out any species could leave a predator without prey, or a plant without a pollinator.

    But surely our environment is so diverse that the empty niche that polinates plants or feeds swallows will be filled by something else. The ecosystem could potentiall function as normal - perhaps better without mosquitoes.
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    Jan 21 2014: where I live in the United States, I almost never see a mosquito. But when I occasionally kill a mosquito, I then will usually eat it raw, I usually eat raw any bug I kill, such as a cockroach, ant, or spider.

    If a bug tastes bitter, I would probably eat it slowly, the trick is to hold it in your mouth for a while, maybe just bite it a little with your teeth, ingest the juice that comes out, rest a little while still holding the bug in your mouth, bite it a little more, ingest the juice, rest a little while still holding it in your mouth, and so on.