jelly young

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Do whatever your boss asking ,abide by the rule your superior made,does this means human rights violation?

people working for the boss and gain less salary, can't say no,have no rights to object, do the extra work whatever the boss asked.It violate my freedom.How do you think?

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    Jan 8 2014: To ask employee to work extra hours without paying and negotiation beforehand(like how it is stated in your contract with the them)is actually against the Labor Law.What have you done so far regarding that? I'm pretty sure you can complain to the local labor monitoring group or apply for arbitration if you want to be compensated,but that generally leads to leaving of your current job.Weigh over different options to make a informed decision.
    I would think that "do whatever your boss tell you "more of a leadership style rather than "individual vs collectivism"because in a authority-centralized model it is the small group that makes the decision while the majority implement them,the pro is that it takes less time to make a decision and can be very effective especially the con is that many will feel dis-engaged or their ideas not being valued.
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    Jan 8 2014: This is the problem with most autocratic business hierarchies. Unfortunately, as Carolyn explained, this business model exists regardless of what country you live in. Thankfully many of these business models are phasing out. Some work environments are becoming more "democratic" and don't follow the archaic top-down hierarchies of the past, but it might take several more decades for everything to change.

    If it is economically possible for you to do so, try to search for other careers or continue your education if necessary.
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    Jan 8 2014: why you can't say no? you pretty much can. you can say: okay, guess what, i'm out of here. and then you leave. you leave, because you are on his property. if you are at home, you just put the phone down, or close the chat window. so i don't see how would your freedom be violated by this.
  • Jan 8 2014: So sorry to hear you are being taken advantage of, it sounds very unfair. Its a tough situation tobe in. I have been in a similar situation. I was being paid salary, which was originally supposed to compensate me for a 40 hour work week. As time went by my days got longer and longer and ended up work 60-70 hours a week. It turns out that if I had documented my extra hours I could have sued for compensation but I was being automatically clocked in and out on our electronic time card system. We are lucky here in the U.S. to have reasonable workers rights though they have been degraded over the last years. They came at a high cost, in the early 1900s a lot of people fought (and far too many suffered and died) to gain these rights. Unions are not what they used to be. but I am grateful to those that sacrificed for us. Good luck

    Edit: the one thing would recommend is that you try to find and secure a new job while you are still employed. I got fed up and one day let my temper get the best of me and I just quit and had to scramble to find another job. Again, good luck.
  • Jan 8 2014: Reminds me of my time in the military actually...
    At least your salary abides by minimum wage laws, you can go home once you're done working, and no one is trying to kill you.

    Still, even without those parts, those sound like unreasonable conditions. To a westerner I'd recommend unionizing, or researching what worker's rights are defended by law, but I'm not sure either of those would work very well in China. Have you considered seeking other employment?
    • Jan 8 2014: Sorry, I commented before I read all the posts. Didn't mean to repeat what you had already said. Good point about nobody trying to kill you!
  • Jan 8 2014: I am expressing my own opinion, and there aren't much research made behind what I will say.

    If you do believe there is place for changes, you're in the right track. As far as I know it takes lots of time to make something happen. The longer you will remember your values which might be pretty good, you will be successful as making a change in your life and the people surrounding you.

    Doing what your boss and superior wants you to do is important if you want to keep your job, and I am a stubborn person, I know what I'm talking about :). Having no rights is one of the most discussed subject internationally and someday you will find other people having the same values and issues and together you will find a way to make significant changes for you and other people around. Speaking up is one of the first step and I do believe this website is a good place to have advice from people coming from different country which might also have the same kind of issues and will be able to give you advice and tools to deal with this issue.

    Fortunately I live in Canada and we do have very good human rights, but we are also a country always there with a helping hand and we have been present in many country for years and it will continue.

    If you want more help or caring words, reply to me and I will be pleased to send you motivating stories to help you go through your journey.

    -Chris
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    Jan 8 2014: May I ask which kind of company do you work with? I know in some Japanese companies, this is very normal. But what do you mean by "less salary", did your boss just reduce your salary?How's your colleagues' feelings about your company?
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      Jan 8 2014: i'm work in the local government, like the community in US. We have no salary for extra work ,we must on call 24 hours. I know many Japanese work like this model, the different is that they do everything according to the corresponding rule. We do everything in work according to the collectivism which advocated by government. That maybe is the cultural reflection of Chinese collectivism.
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        Jan 8 2014: “I know many Japanese work like this model, the different is that they do everything according to the corresponding rule. We do everything in work according to the collectivism which advocated by government.”
        Sorry, I haven't done the kind of your job before, can you elaborate these sentences or give me an example?
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          Jan 8 2014: Sorry that my statement not clearly. Give you a example of extra work. Generally, most company make the relevant rules for extra work---double salary or triple. Some country like Japan ,US, people in there value their private time and try not to take private time to work. Over the left,in china, the country is the most important that individualism should submit to the collectivism. When we work in the weekend,we have no extra salary,we can't say no to superior for I have a family party.
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        Jan 8 2014: I think working for community should be some kinda of voluntary, right?Are you a volunteer or an intern in the governmental unit? If you don't like it, you can refuse to do it over time. Why do you feel you have to take up the job without any interests? I know in Shanghai, working for the local government in every residential community is quite comfortable: only need to work 6hours a day. No overtime work at all. And it's very strange that if it's a governmental unit, how can it break the law not to pay you for the extra time or have you work over time without any reasonable and clear regulations? You can report it to the local Labor and Social Security Department to justify your rights. Don't have the wrong idea that this kind of job is common in China. You just tried one job and still have the opportunities to find other better ones.

        And for a positive view, I'd still like to advise you that you should think of some good aspects of the job you did. At least you learned something through the job,right? You have known more things about your community, what the society is really like,what kind of work you don't like to do, and you may have found and made many friends when you were doing the job…..in short, you've grown through it whether it's pleasant or not. You'd better embrace the gratitude for the past experience to make the best of it to welcome your future.

        Wish you find a better job soon~!:)
        • Jan 8 2014: Mind if I stick my nose in here? Lol
          I agree that whatever happens, one can learn a lot of things through the job experience.
          I’ve heard many of Chinese workers tend to be motivated by “responsibility” when doing their jobs at work. IMHO, wouldn’t it be true that they do their best for themselves as individuals—not because out of some sort of duty toward the community they happened to belong to?
          Aren’t a lot of young Chinese work-force focusing on developing their individual capabilities?
          For I’ve heard they’re getting much more competitive and competent than ever before
    • Jan 8 2014: Mind if I stick my nose in here? Lol
      I agree that whatever happens, one can learn a lot of things through the job experience.
      I’ve heard many of Chinese workers tend to be motivated by “responsibility” when doing their jobs at work. IMHO, wouldn’t it be true that they do their best for themselves as individuals—not because out of some sort of duty toward the community they happened to belong to?
      Aren’t a lot of young Chinese work-force focusing on developing their individual capabilities?
      For I’ve heard they’re getting much more competitive and competent than ever before
  • Jan 7 2014: till the time your chained to the floor and forced to work... no

    you have the right to quit your job anytime you wish, those are your human rights

    anything else is down to contract law and your contract of employment and the term in it, which you should have read before you sign it

    if you have no contract, you have no boss, what you have is a guy who happens to pay you when and how much he decides he wants too
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    Jan 7 2014: Why do you say can't say no, if you don't like the job you shouldn't take the job, or you should quit, am I right? Or complain to the government. At least that's how it is in the United States, maybe it's different in China?

    jelly if you want more time on this conversation, click "edit" and add more time, up to one month. Right now you have 22 hours.
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      Jan 8 2014: yes,maybe I can quit. I'm not just to complain ,the general situation I realized is that most work shouldn't say no. I have already decided to quit to carve out. In china, you have to obey if u r not the superior, which is the general working environment. Chinese educated by collectivism while collectivism not equal to absolute obedience in my eyes.
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        Jan 8 2014: What do you mean by "carve out"? In America you generally should obey if the supervisor is asking you to do something reasonable and you want to keep your job, but if it's unreasonable you should fight it either by talking to the supervisor, or talking to the higher boss who is above the supervisor, or complaining to the government, or quitting. Sometimes you might even be able to bring a lawsuit and collect some money from the employer if they asked you to do something unreasonable, or pressured you to do something unreasonable, or did it more than one time.