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Paula Cano

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To all food lovers: Do we want to continue not knowing exactly how and where our food items are being grown and manufactured?

I invite everyone to do some research, it is truly interesting what you can find. And if anyone sees anything that could be done better, I encourage you to add it into your list of goals or purpose in 2014. We can all effect big time change if we focused on this just a little bit more! Anyway, Happy 2014! Hope everyone is in good health and ready for another chance!

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  • Jan 4 2014: We can put all the labels we want on our foods, do all the research we want, but unless the general public is educated enough to know how the human body functions (protein for muscles, carbs and water for energy, vitamins and minerals for cell regeneration etc), it's hard work done in vain. Ex: A box of ceral costs more than a large container of Oatmeal, which do you think is better for you? The one with the TV advertisement and the colorful box with great designs and bold print saying "reduces cholesterol".
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      Jan 4 2014: True, but if you see a label, telling you that only 15% of the cereal you are consuming are real food ingredients, and the rest are additives, but it reduces cholesterol. you might take a second look at the slightly more expensive container of Oatmeal or granola, that has 100% real food ingredients and pure cane sugar. Slow change, maybe not even for our generation, but, do we not think it is worth it to take a few steps in that direction?
      This is a gigantic industry, but for example:

      http://gmoinside.org/victory-consumers-general-mills-announces-original-cheerios-now-non-gmo/
      or
      http://www.robynobrien.com/_blog/Inspiring_Ideas/post/wall-streets-leading-indicator-a-non-gmo-burrito/

      It may even be closer than we realize, but we all have to be on board!
      • Jan 5 2014: Where exactly do you live? Oatmeal is way cheaper than cereal. A box of cereal is like $3 to $5 in New York, if you're going for something decent. A large container of Oatmeal goes for $2.30 to $4.75, and that's the general brand. Oats are oats, it doesn't matter if it's Quakers or not, we don't add anything to it before it's packaged. Buying expensive oats is like buying flavored water, a very bad move. I made the switch from cereal to oats a couple of months back, and boy was that a great move. Both for my body and my pockets.

        Consumerism makes you think that Cheerios and all these other "healthy cereals" are better for you. But they're only better if you compare them to the rest of the cereals that they sell you.A ruby among rocks is a jewel, but a ruby among diamonds is a rock.

        Humans have lived on basic oats for thousands of years, it's filled with nutrients and all you need is water and/or milk to prepare it. These cereals have a bunch of added stuff to them that your body makes an extra effort to process. GMO in your cereal? Skip it, just switch to oatmeal.

        "True, but if you see a label, telling you that only 15% of the cereal you are consuming are real food ingredients, and the rest are additives, but it reduces cholesterol.". Isn't that the label of all mass produced foods though haha? Half the stuff is not even natural and says it right on the box, yet people still buy it.
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          Jan 6 2014: That's why i said, Oatmeal or granola. Because the ingredients can vary and it is usually more expensive than a $3.00 box of cereal. granola is the diamond of cereals, so many options, and great for you, too. Oats are a must in granola.

          "Isn't that the label of all mass produced foods though haha? Half the stuff is not even natural and says it right on the box, yet people still buy it."

          It doesnt say explicitly that it is not natural, it just gives you the name of the compound or ingredient, and expects you to know what it is and how it affects your body. Unless you are an informed citizen, which i suspect you are, in which case, this doesnt apply, and you dont need more explanations, you simply choose to switch to oats, which is good.
          But for a lot of people, this is not the case.
          We can be more effective at labeling our porducts, in ways that bridge that gap. Why not make some improvements? there are a lot of items still without labels, like a starbucks latte, or most of the fast food we consume.
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      Jan 5 2014: Jean,
      That is a very good point! We can label food all we want, and unless people know what the label means and how the body functions, the label really doesn't help that much.

      For example, I've seen foods with lots of undesirable ingredients, and at the end of the list, they put "fortified with vitamin A, C, B and K"......or something like that. So, some folks look at that and think......wow.....fortified with vitamins and minerals.... it must be good for me!!! When, in fact, there may be so much "junk" in the product that the less useful "stuff" far outweighs anything that might be added to make it look healthy.

      They (researchers) are also discovering that by the time vitamins and minerals are processed, as they are, to put them in capsules, or additives in foods, there usually are not many nutrients left. Fresh, unprocessed foods are generally more nutritious.

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