TED Conversations

This conversation is closed.

Does lacking physical beauty actually degrades ones confidence?

I ask this question because I certainly feel that we learn more when ideas are exchanged amongst people that requires socializing and having a certain level of confidence. I understand that there are several other aspects that can pump ones confidence be it wealth, inteliigence, knowledge or success but surely ones appearance also plays a major role. How does one get past that factor of beauty for which god was not knid enough and move on without giving it much weightage.

Share:

Showing single comment thread. View the full conversation.

  • thumb
    Dec 20 2013: Perhaps you should watch some of your favorite TED talks and ask yourself whether it matters to you, or should matter to him/her, whether he/she is beautiful in the ways you mean. Kenneth Robinson? Bill Gates? Larry Lessig?

    Wouldn't you think your other attributes are far more important?
    • Dec 20 2013: I do realize the importance of other attributes Fritzie, infact I believe they hold more value than the physical beauty as I mentioned in the explanation of the question, what I really wanted to know to what extent it does matter or should matter, I say that because we can't just ignore the confidence being beautiful brings on to you. Hope I m clear now!
      • thumb
        Jan 16 2014: I think this assumption you are making that being beautiful makes a person confident is problematic. I know many people, men and women, whom I believe many would judge as physically beautiful, who harbor low self-esteem and lack of self-confidence.
    • thumb
      Dec 20 2013: f are you trying to say none of those three men is beautiful? But it's clear they've put some effort into their look, all are nicely groomed, clean-shaven, well-dressed. If they were filthy bums, they probably wouldn't have risen to the level where they are giving a TED talk.
      • thumb
        Dec 20 2013: People are typically beautiful to those who love them, but I don't think this thread is on that subject, that has been discussed often here.

        My point is that for pretty much anyone, however he looks, he can find plenty of happy, loved, respected, and accomplished people who are no better looking than he is.
        • thumb
          Dec 21 2013: Fritzie it seems like you're affirming the saying "You can't judge a book by its cover." I sort of want to believe that saying is true, there is a certain beauty in that saying. Yet on the other hand I've noticed that when I look good I feel good, and when I look and feel good I do better, accomplish more and get better help from people whose help I need to accomplish. Does this mean I'm superficial, or that the people who respond to me better are superficial? On the other hand, there's some sensuality and skill in grooming yourself, so maybe looking good conveys a positive sensuality and skill?

          The three men you named look okay but all wear glasses and would look better without them. I'm thinking for most people wearing glasses mars their look?

          I was reading that most people consider Asians to be the most physically attractive race, and it's because they are the most childlike-looking. Thoughts?
      • thumb
        Dec 21 2013: I believe there is research to the effect that being pleasant looking and not over-weight provides an advantage in the workplace.

        I am the wrong person to ask about standards of beauty. I also expect standards of beauty to vary across cultures. For example, being thin is valued in some cultures more than others.

Showing single comment thread. View the full conversation.