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Pierre Ferkous

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What will be the biggest threat for humanity ?

Humanity gives themselves courage in order to overcome his fear. Threats like Global warming, the asteroids, nuclear catastrophe, world wide deadly pandemic, invading aliens ... will be a world scourge. But Which of these, according you, can wipe out mankind?

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  • Dec 8 2013: Personally, I think a combination of global warning and pandemics caused by global warming will be the most immediate threat to humanity. I think (at least here in the US) there is a great deal of ignorance about both subjects. I don't think a lot of people understand the multitude of problems that will be caused by global warming (whether they believe it's natural or man made). One of those things is that diseases that were largely relegated to certain areas of the global by climate and environmental factors may be able to quickly migrate to areas of the global that have had limited, or no, previous exposure to those diseases. The outcome could be really horrible. Especially, since what I've read indicates that there is little in the way of a global plan to deal with a pandemic.
    I don't rule out an Meteorite either - though I don't think that as likely at this time.
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      Dec 10 2013: The only problem with the global pandemic caused by climate change hypothesis is that the majority of the Earth's human population already lives in the tropical zone where these potential pandemics are supposed to come from.
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          Dec 10 2013: Yes but as I said the majority of the worlds population already live in malaria prone areas. The fact that people in the US are getting malaria more often doesn't make any difference to the 4 billion asians africans and south americans that already deal with tropical diseases every day. Afteral it may surprise you but US citizens only make up about 5% of the worlds population.
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          Dec 10 2013: The vast majority of the worlds population are already exposed to malaria. It's pretty much only North America and Europe that aren't already affected. I think on a global scale you will find it hard to motivate people to try to prevent the spread of diseases they already have.
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        Dec 10 2013: I'm really not sure what American's making up 5% of the population has to do with anything when we're talking about a Infectious disease. You seem to make the assumption that because malaria exists in one place now - that's as bad as it will get for them. Not true. Aside from the fact it leaves out all the other diseases that are currently, for one reason or another, dormant it also drastically over simplifies things.
        http://chge.med.harvard.edu/sites/default/files/resources/Ecologyclimatechange_epstein.pdf
        http://chge.med.harvard.edu/resource/climate-change-and-distribution-and-intensity-infectious-disease
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          Dec 10 2013: As the US represents a small percentage of world population you can hardly expect the world to form strategies to deal with climate change based on its effects in the US. On a world scale the widening of the tropical disease zone is only a minor concern compared to increasing intensity of tropical storms or sea level rise.
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          Dec 11 2013: Nearly half the worlds population lives in southern Asia. At least 1.5billion in malaria prone areas. There is another 300million in tropical South America and around 500million in tropical Africa. And these are concervative estimates.
          http://www.cdc.gov/malaria/about/distribution.html
          Notice how the red and yellow bits are the bits where most of the worlds population lives.
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          Dec 11 2013: "The majority of large countries in Europe, Russia, Canada and the US have a low malaria risk at present."
          And the combined population of all those countries is about the same as India. So about a third of the number of people already exposed.
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          Dec 11 2013: With regard to the question at the top of the page, even if the deaths from tropical diseases increases ten fold it still won't be the biggest threat.
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          Dec 13 2013: Lucky for us medicine has come a long way since 1918. If we were having this discussion 100 years ago I would agree with you, but we are not.

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